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The Dark Knight (DVD, 2008, 2-Disc Set)
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Director Christopher Nolan (MEMENTO, THE PRESTIGE) returns to Gotham City with this sequel to the critically-acclaimed fan favourite, BATMAN BEGINS. In THE DARK KNIGHT, Batman...Read more
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...oO~*~Oo... A truly brilliant film...oO~*~Oo..
"The Dark Knight" is pure adrenaline. Returning director Christopher Nolan, having dispensed with his introspective, moody origin story, now puts the Caped Crusader ...Read more
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The Dark Knight (DVD)
For a superhero Batman doesn’t have much fun. The gadgets, the underground cave, the superb car that transforms itself into an armoured tank and a turbo motorcycle - all of th...Read more
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Director Christopher Nolan (MEMENTO, THE PRESTIGE) returns to Gotham City with this sequel to the critically-acclaimed fan favourite, BATMAN BEGINS. In THE DARK KNIGHT, Batman (Christian Bale – RESCUE DAWN, AMERICAN PSYCHO) squares off against a new, completely psychotic foe: the Joker (Heath Ledger – BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN, A KNIGHT'S TALE). However, the Dark Knight finds himself fighting a battle on two fronts when he learns that a prominent political figure named Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart – IN THE COMPANY OF MEN, ERIN BROCKOVICH) is concealing a dastardly alter-ego known as Two Face.

Credits
Leading Role 1Maggie Gyllenhaal
Leading Role 2Aaron Eckhart
Additional Roles byMichael Caine, Christian Bale, Gary Oldman, Heath Ledger
Director 1Christopher Nolan
ProducerCharles Roven, Christopher Nolan, Emma Thomas
ScreenwriterChristopher Nolan, Jonathan Nolan
Score ComposerJames Newton Howard, Hans Zimmer
EditorLee Smith

Features
Region2
Release FormatDVD
Rating12
Release Year2008
GenreAction/Adventure
Additional GenreGeneral
LanguageEnglish
Running Time146 minutes
EAN7321902176581

eBay product ID: EPID66618165
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The Dark Knight (DVD, 2008, 2-Disc Set)
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...oO~*~Oo... A truly brilliant film...oO~*~Oo..

Created: 18/06/09
"The Dark Knight" is pure adrenaline. Returning director Christopher Nolan, having dispensed with his introspective, moody origin story, now puts the Caped Crusader through a decathlon of explosions, vehicle flips, hand-to-hand combat, midair rescues and pulse-pounding suspense. Just like Batman should be and Nloan manages to capture what he visualizes from the stories of old.

Nolan is one of our smarter directors. He builds movies around ideas and characters, and "Dark Knight" is no exception. The ideas here are not new to the movie world of cops and criminal, but in the context of a comic book movie, they ring out with startling clarity. In other words, you expect moralistic underpinnings in a Martin Scorsese movie; in a Batman movie, they hit home with renewed vigor.

None of this artistic achievement denies the re-energized Warner Bros./DC Comics franchise its commercial muscle. Those bags of money in the movie's opening bank heist are nothing compared with the worldwide boxoffice haul "Dark Knight" has taken from cinemas. Repeat viewings are a must.

A truly brilliant film.
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The Dark Knight (DVD)

Created: 24/12/08
For a superhero Batman doesn’t have much fun. The gadgets, the underground cave, the superb car that transforms itself into an armoured tank and a turbo motorcycle - all of this counts for nothing because he is such a misery, torn between good and bad, his day incarnation as the suave playboy Bruce Wayne set against his caped-crusader alter ego.

Wayne/Batman doesn’t know who or what he’s supposed to be, what his responsibilities are and where he should take his frustrated love for the gorgeous Rachel Dawes
The title of this new Batman is revealing: he can swoop over the city all he likes, but he gets no pleasure from meting out justice, or playing the big guy. This is one gloomy superhero whose navel gazing is accentuated by his glottal, laryngitis-like growl.

The genius of The Dark Knight is that Christopher Nolan, the film’s director, producer and co-writer (with brother Jonathan) has not only produced a stunning, amazing comic book movie, but also one with an intellectual heart and a tough, unresolved message at its end. Nolan, who directed the last Bat-movie (Batman Begins in 2005), has a masterful grip on his hero.

The Dark Knight is 152 minutes long, but is transfixing and all-enveloping, rather than arduous. Buses crash, hospitals are blown up, car chases are conducted at a shocking velocity, the epic design of the film is a character in its own right - but there, right at the heart, lies the question of what Batman is for, and whether his presence brings more danger than it does safety. Whose responsibility is it to preside over justice? This is never laboured or pontificated over, as in some Batman films. It is there, rightly and naturally, behind everything he does, behind every fight, every confrontation, every life-or-death decision.

The talking point thus far has been Heath Ledger as The Joker. Will the performance accord him a posthumous Oscar? Is it odd to watch the actor? No, because he delivers a career-defining performance. With his face a peeling façade of clown paint and his mouth a blurred slash, The Joker is the embodiment of anarchy and antiorder. He is the hero’s mirror image: the world thinks they are freaks. They need each other.

Ledger is so terrifying and unpredictable that his very presence on screen makes you horribly nervous – the atrocities he visits on his victims are bloody and vile-minded, and when he arrives at a party at the Wayne penthouse you feel sick as he observes the guests. He preys on our fear and sense of violation; what can Batman do to save us from that?

Ghoulish observation of Ledger shouldn’t obscure the brilliance of the other performances, notably Aaron Eckhart as the avenging prosecutor Harvey Dent. Dent, and his terrible fate, is the moral core of the film. Like Batman, he journeys plausibly from the light side to the dark.

Christian Bale as Batman is at his most emotional when wearing a mask: he loves the kit, but you sense he might want to be a smirking playboy after all and leave baddie-catching to the likes of Dent.

The Dark Knight will stun and surprise, delight and terrify, and it won’t be the special effects, gizmos and bat-heroics that will keep you pinned to your seat, but the moral force of the script and an ending that takes our hero, unbelievably and brilliantly, to even darker realms.
4 of 4 people found this review helpful.
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Batman - The Dark Knight

Created: 10/01/09
The title of this new Batman is revealing: he can swoop over the city all he likes, but he gets no pleasure from meting out justice, or playing the big guy. This is one gloomy superhero whose navel gazing is accentuated by his glottal, laryngitis-like growl.

The genius of The Dark Knight is that Christopher Nolan, the film’s director, producer and co-writer (with brother Jonathan) has not only produced a stunning, amazing comic book movie, but also one with an intellectual heart and a tough, unresolved message at its end. Nolan, who directed the last Bat-movie (Batman Begins in 2005), has a masterful grip on his hero.

The Dark Knight is 152 minutes long, but is transfixing and all-enveloping, rather than arduous. Buses crash, hospitals are blown up, car chases are conducted at a shocking velocity, the epic design of the film is a character in its own right - but there, right at the heart, lies the question of what Batman is for, and whether his presence brings more danger than it does safety. Whose responsibility is it to preside over justice? This is never laboured or pontificated over, as in some Batman films. It is there, rightly and naturally, behind everything he does, behind every fight, every confrontation, every life-or-death decision.

The talking point thus far has been Heath Ledger as The Joker. Will the performance accord him a posthumous Oscar? Is it odd to watch the actor? No, because he delivers a career-defining performance. With his face a peeling façade of clown paint and his mouth a blurred slash, The Joker is the embodiment of anarchy and antiorder. He is the hero’s mirror image: the world thinks they are freaks. They need each other.

Ledger is so terrifying and unpredictable that his very presence on screen makes you horribly nervous – the atrocities he visits on his victims are bloody and vile-minded, and when he arrives at a party at the Wayne penthouse you feel sick as he observes the guests. He preys on our fear and sense of violation; what can Batman do to save us from that?

Ghoulish observation of Ledger shouldn’t obscure the brilliance of the other performances, notably Aaron Eckhart as the avenging prosecutor Harvey Dent. Dent, and his terrible fate, is the moral core of the film. Like Batman, he journeys plausibly from the light side to the dark.

Christian Bale as Batman is at his most emotional when wearing a mask: he loves the kit, but you sense he might want to be a smirking playboy after all and leave baddie-catching to the likes of Dent.

The Dark Knight will stun and surprise, delight and terrify, and it won’t be the special effects, gizmos and bat-heroics that will keep you pinned to your seat, but the moral force of the script and an ending that takes our hero, unbelievably and brilliantly, to even darker realms.
2 of 2 people found this review helpful.
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What a brilliant Film, worth buying on DVD

Created: 10/08/08
I went to the pictures to watch this film with my Boyfriend and at first i wasn't so sure of it, as i'm more a girl for chick flicks, but i went along because he wanted to see it.
Wasn't looking forward to it at all because i thought it'd be boring... and guess what.....
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I WAS SOOOOOOO WRONG!
The Dark Knight is sooooo Goooooood it is DEFINATELY WORTH BUYING, especially if it's bought off ebay, cos u can get it cheaper, so you'll be even more happy haha.
But honstly, it's absolutely great and the Joker, Heath Ledger played the best part, what an absolute character he played.
The film, overall is funny as well as being one of those films that keeps you on the edge of your seat wanting to know more...

Review:
With just one year having passed after taking out Ra's Al Ghul's plan to have Gotham eliminated and the mysterious disappearance of Dr. Jonathan Crane AKA the Scarecrow, and after the city was nearly plundered with his toxins, Bruce Wayne and his vigilante alter-ego the Batman, continue the seemingly endless effort to bring order to Gotham, with the help of Lt. James Gordon and newly appointed District Attorney Harvey Dent. But a new threat has now emerged into the streets. The Dark Knight faces a rising psychopathic criminal called The Joker, whose eerie grin, laughter, and inhuman morality makes him as dangerous than what he has yet to unleash. It becomes an agenda to Batman to stop the mysterious Joker at all costs, knowing that both of them are in an opposite line. One has no method at all and seeks to see the world plunge into the fire he has yet to light. One represents the symbol of hope and uses his own shadow to bring the peace and order he has yet to accomplish doing.
3 of 4 people found this review helpful.
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Dark Masterpiece Surpasses Hype

Created: 14/12/08
Christopher Nolan has a vision. And whether you agree with it or not, he undeniably completes it in "The Dark Knight"--a vicious, engrossing, overwhelming, intelligent event- film that re-defines 'comic-book-flicks'. In Nolan's grim, dark-depiction of Gotham-City (the crime-ridden hell protected by legendary superhero Batman), the director strives to make everything real (something he began in the well-received "Batman Begins"). He makes it plausible, possible. And yet there's more to it: just as 'Begins' was a dissection of myth, the nature of symbols and heroes, 'Knight' is the escalation of that notion. It's a biblical- confrontation of 'good-and-evil', yet as 'good-and-evil' really exist: a conflict of ideals, something that can't be purely-defined but that is relative to a viewpoint. In Nolan's world, the line of villainy and heroism isn't crossed... it's non-existent. The bad-guys don't see themselves as bad-guys, and as such something so unnervingly-real comes across it might fly past some people's minds (no insult to anybody, it's just common that people don't look deep into 'popcorn-flicks'): the battle is a complete ambiguity.

The film runs at nearly 2.5-hours, yet never ceases to lose interest or momentum. It doesn't waste a scene or moment; every event is utilized and necessary. 'The Dark Knight' tells a story worth telling and it takes the proper amount of time to tell it. Action-sequences are frantic, old-school, eye-grabbing stunts (vastly superior to 'Begins') and in their chaotic intensity we see that they serve purpose to the story, yet more interesting are not played for pure entertainment-value: we are meant to watch, petrified, simply hoping that the outcome will go the hero's way. Attention is never lost because we are immersed in a breathtaking, almost completely-unpredictable story (it packs many a shock), that makes us think and more importantly gains our emotional-investment. We come to care for the characters, because they are believable, developed, and personified fully.

Everyone has great-chemistry together. Maggie Gyllenhal is a more mature Rachel Dawes than Katie Holmes. Morgan Freeman provides his authoritative presence to the role of bad- gadget-inventor/Wayne-Enterpri​se CEO Lucius Fox, and under anyone else's portrayal, the part would be less-memorable. Gary Oldman underplays his world-wearied lawman with such honest-nobility, you never feel for a second any of its forced-acting. The irreplaceable Michael Caine makes a gentle, reassuring, father-like presence as Alfred, and the movie would surely fail without his strong-presence and interjected-moments of light-humor.

And while everyone (rightfully) pours the praise unto Bale and Ledger, I think most are glancing-over Knight's breakout-performance. As Harvey Dent, Aaron Eckhart does more than hold himself in the company of such a renowned-cast. He makes his presence known, whether he's playing on the easy-going charisma of Gotham's 'White-Knight' or the broken and damaged, twisted-soul of Two-Face. He achieves a full-impact with the tragedy that comes unto his character, and so closely connects with Dent, that he makes his pain tangible for us: we sympathize even as we become terrified. He captures both facets of each personality flawlessly.

Now, some people cite that 'Knight' has a potential fatal-flaw in the supposedly wooden- acting of Christian Bale. Admittedly, his development is not as grand as in 'Begins' (yet that film gave us such a good ps
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