Beautiful Garden Stone Statue Ornaments

Views 3 Likes Comments Comment
Like if this guide is helpful
Buy From Bargain Garden Antiques With Free UK Mainland Delivery
Edit Link Remove
Add up to 1 more photo
Buy From Bargain Garden Antiques With Free UK Mainland Delivery
Edit Link Remove
Add up to 1 more photo
Buy From Bargain Garden Antiques With Free UK Mainland Delivery
Edit Link Remove
Add up to 1 more photo
Buy From Bargain Garden Antiques With Free UK Mainland Delivery
Edit Link Remove
Add up to 1 more photo
Buy From Bargain Garden Antiques With Free UK Mainland Delivery

Garden Ornament Beginnings

The first known use of garden ornaments became common in the western cultures are in Ancient Roman gardens. A great many examples have been excavated from Pompeii and Herculaneum. The Italian Renaissance garden and Garden à la française were the peak styles of using created forms in the garden and landscape, with high art and kitsch interpretations ever since. The English Landscape Garden expanded the scale of some garden ornaments to temple follies

At Bargain Garden Antiques We Offer A Wonderful Appealing Range Of Garden Statue Ornaments For Your Garden. We Hand Decorate Each Piece To Create A Gorgeous Weathered Style.    

What Is A Statue?

A statue is a sculpture representing one or more people or animals (including abstract concepts allegorically represented as people or animals), normally full-length, as opposed to a bust, and at least close to life-size, or larger.[1] A small statue, usually small enough to be picked up, is called a statuette or figurine.

Ancient statues often survive showing the bare surface of the material of which they are made. For example, many people associate Greek classical art with white marble sculpture, but there is evidence that many statues were painted in bright colours.[2] Most of the colour was weathered off over time; small remnants were removed during cleaning; in some cases small traces remained which could be identified.[2] A travelling exhibition of 20 coloured replicas of Greek and Roman works, alongside 35 original statues and reliefs, was held in Europe and the United States in 2008: Gods in Color: Painted Sculpture of Classical Antiquity.[3]Details such as whether the paint was applied in one or two coats, how finely the pigments were ground, or exactly which binding medium would have been used in each case—all elements that would affect the appearance of a finished piece—are not known. Richter goes so far as to say of classical Greek sculpture, "`All stone sculpture, whether limestone or marble, was painted, either wholly or in part." [4]

Medieval statues were also usually painted, with some still retaining their original pigments. The colouring of statues ceased during the Renaissance, as excavated classical sculptures, which had lost their colouring, became regarded as the best models.
Have something to share, create your own guide... Write a guide
Explore more guides