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Body Piercing Guide - Piercing Types 2 - Facial & Oral

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Body Piercing Guide - Piercing Types 2 - Facial & Oral
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Body Piercing Guide 2

Facial & Oral Piercing Types

Bridge Piercing

A bridge piercing is a body piercing through the bridge of the nose, usually directly between the eyes of the wearer. A variation on this piercing, the vertical bridge piercing is a surface piercing, with all of the risks or potential complications related to surface piercings.
Bridge piercings are most commonly pierced with straight barbells, although curved barbells and surface bars are also possible initial jewellery. Once the piercing is healed, it is possible to wear a captive bead ring in it, although depending on the placement of the piercing, a D-ring styled ring may be necessary to prevent migration caused by the pressure exerted by the shape of a ring.

Like many other facial piercings, there are many misconceptions about bridge piercings. Some involve eye problems, such as involuntary eye crossing. Other beliefs have to do with infections from piercings spreading to the brain, via the sinuses. Bridge piercings are a minor piercing and carry very few risks or complications and no impact to the eyes.

Cheek Piercing

A cheek piercing is a facial body piercing through the cheek. A piercing that travels along the skin of the face and does not penetrate into the oral cavity would be a surface piercing, such as an anti eyebrow. They are often placed in symmetrical pairs and often in the dimples of the cheek, if the bearer has dimples to pierce. It is an uncommon piercing.

Cheek piercings are normally pierced with flat backed labret studs, a type of barbell jewellery. The flat back provides comfort and lessens the chance of the jewellery damaging the teeth and gums of the bearer. The external end of the labret stud can be decorative in nature. Initial jewellery may be long, to allow for any swelling caused by the piercing. Proper length of jewellery in a healed piercing is important to protect the teeth and gums.

Eyebrow Piercing

An eyebrow piercing is a type of body piercing done through the eyebrow, usually vertically. Eyebrow piercings are relatively common facial piercings. They may be pierced anywhere along the eyebrow from directly above the eye to the edge of the eyebrow.

Eyebrow piercings are a type of surface piercing and share the risk of migration and aftercare issues that all surface piercings have. Usually they take 6-8 weeks to heal, but they are easily irritated, often by casual contact on the part of the bearer, which can lead to much longer healing times or migration. Makeup or other beauty products that are applied to the face can also irritate the piercing or cause it to become infected.

Anti-Eyebrow

Anti-eyebrow piercings are a variant of the standard eyebrow piercings, with the placement of the jewellery being along the lower orbit of the eye, at the top of the cheekbones. These are a more traditional surface piercing and carry much higher rates of migration and rejection than the standard eyebrow piercing, due to the lack of excess skin in the area to relieve the pressure of the piercing. Usually custom shaped jewellery is used in these piercings, due to the unusual placement and the risk of migration.
Barbells, curved barbells and captive bead rings are all common jewellery types worn in eyebrow piercings. All of these jewellery types put varying degrees of pressure on the piercing, which can cause irritation or migration over time, especially in fresh piercings. Unlike many other surface piercings, surface bars or other appropriate jewellery is not always used in the initial piercing, and the use of more commonly available body piercing jewellery often creates an unnecessarily large risk of migration or rejection in eyebrow piercings.

Labret

A labret is one form of body piercing. Taken literally, it is any type of adornment that is attached to the facial lip (labrum). However, the term usually refers to a piercing that is below the bottom lip, above the chin.A labret is a lip piercing pierced with a labret stud. A flat disc sits between the back of the lip and the gums and a bead sits on the outside of the lip. Labrets can pierced in the centre, or off-centre.

A vertical labret goes through the center of the bottom lip, parallel to the tissue (the bar has a slight curve, and is visible both below the bottom lip and in between the top and bottom lips).


Lip fraenulum piercing

A lip fraenulum piercing is a body piercing through either the upper (known as a smiley piercing) or lower (known as a web piercing) lip frenulums. These piercings are relatively simple piercings, and heal quickly, although they do have a high tendency to reject over time. Depending on the anatomy of the individual, either of these piercing placements may not be feasible.
Aftercare for lip frenulum piercings is more complicated than most other piercings, as the healing piercing will come into contact with anything that enters the mouth, including food and smoke. For these reasons, many certified piercers suggest as after care guidelines, not to engage in oral sex, not to smoke, and regular rinsing after eating or drinking with either an appropriate mouthwash or saline fluid.
Jewellery worn in lip frenulum piercings comes into contact with both teeth and gums. This contact is not known to damage the tooth enamel or the gum tissue.
Both ring and barbell style jewellery can be worn in these piercings. Usually the jewellery worn in these piercings is low gauge, as there is not much tissue to pierce or stretch, and larger gauge jewellery may be more likely to damage the teeth and gums.

Lip Piercing

Lip piercings are a type of body piercings which penetrate the lips or, more commonly, the area surrounding the lips. The lips and surrounding area can be pierced in a variety of ways.

Most lip piercings heal relatively quickly, although extra care must be taken during the healing process as food, smoke and liquids will come into contact with the piercing.

When the lip is pierced, a larger ring or labret stud will be put in to accommodate swelling. This can be changed to smaller ring or stud when the swelling goes down.

Most lip piercings have the potential to damage both teeth and gums if proper jewellery is not worn, or if the placement of the individual piercing is poor. Labret piercings can result in gum erosion over time, but lip rings do not touch the gums. A home-made saline solution is a common way to heal a lip piercing and avoid infection. Combine 1/8 tsp. sea salt to 1 cup of warm water. This solution can be used to rinse out the mouth after eating and to soak the outside of the piercing using a cotton ball. Anything with alcohol, peroxide, iodine, or any strong soaps should be avoided because they may irritate the fresh piercing, and cause additional swelling and trauma.

Lip piercings can be placed anywhere around the mouth, but usually the surface of the lip (the red part) is not pierced.

Lip Piercings in specific positions have specific names:

A lip ring is a ring that goes through the bottom of the lip. It can be centered or Off-Center. This jewellery will have no contact with your gums.

has a slight curve, and is visible both below the bottom lip and in between the top and bottom lips).

A horizontal lip piercing is a horizontal bar, usually through the red part of the lip and usually on the lower lip. This is a very rare piercing.

A Lowebret is just a lower Labret.

The vertical lowbret piercing starts inside the mouth between the lower lip and the teeth (not behind the teeth as with a mandible piercing) and travels straight down, exiting on the lower edge of the jawline.

Lip plates are large lip piercings stretched to the point where they can be worn flipped out/down. They can be solid disks or hollow rings.

Angelbites is the term used for two upper lip piercings on opposite sides of the mouth.

Snakebites is the term used for two lower lip piercings on opposite sides of the mouth. They can be rings or studs.

Spiderbites is the term used for two lower lip piercings on opposite sides of the mouth and a labret or lip ring in the center (generally two rings and a labret, though it can be any combination rings or studs)

Venombites is the term used for two lower lip piercings, side by side on either the left or right sides of the mouth. They can be a combination of rings or studs.

Medusa piercing

A medusa piercing is an upper lip piercing that is placed in the philtrum, directly under the septum of the nose. One ball of the jewellery sits outside of the mouth in the dip of the top lip, while the other ball is inside the lip. Sometimes a longer, curved jewellery can be worn so that the bottom ball sticks out between the lips.
The inside ball can cause gum/tissue irritation if not the correct size.

Monroe Piercing/Madonna Piercing

A Monroe or Madonna piercing is a piercing in the part of the face between the top lip and the nose but on the side of the face. It is typically meant to resemble a beauty mark. It takes its name from Marilyn monroes beauty spot placing and is representational of this.

Nose Piercing

Nose piercing is the piercing of the skin or cartilage which forms any part of the nose, most commonly the left or right side of the nosrils.  among the different varieties of nose piercings, the nostril piercing is the most common. Nose piercing is one of the most common varieties of piercing after earlobe piercing.



Nasal Septum Piercing

A nasal septum piercing is less common than nostril piercings. The nasal septum is the cartilaginous dividing wall between the nostrils. Generally, the cartilage itself is not pierced, but rather the small gap between the cartilage and the bottom of the nose, typically at a gauge no smaller than 14ga (1.6mm). The nose has many nerves running through it and as a result, nose piercings can be painful, although it varies by individual. This piercing heals within a month and a half to three months also depending on the individual.

There are many types of jewellery generally worn in a septum piercing. Captive bead rings (CBRs) are rings that close with a bead in the centre. Circular Barbells (as shown in the picture) have two beads which screw on. Additionally, one can wear a "tusk" which is a straight or shaped piece of material which is generally tapered on either end. Pinchers are another popular piece of jewellery worn in this piercing.

Another option is a septum retainer, which is staple shaped. This type of nose piercing is particularly easy to hide when desired, for example to comply with a dress code. A septum retainer makes it possible to turn the jewellery up into the nose, thus concealing it.

Septum piercing was popular among certain Native American peoples in history; the Shawnee leaders Tecumseh and Tenskwatawa, for example, had such piercings.


Tongue frenulum Piercing

A tongue fraenulum piercing is a body piercing through the frenulum underneath the tongue (frenulum linguae). These piercings are relatively simple piercings, and heal quickly, although they do have a tendency to reject over time. Depending on the anatomy of the individual, this piercing may not be feasible.

Aftercare for tongue frenulum piercings is more complicated than most other piercings, as the healing piercing will come into contact with anything that enters the mouth, including food and smoke. For these reasons, many certified piercers suggest as after care guidelines, not to engage in oral sex, not to smoke, and regular rinsing after eating or drinking with a de-ionized saline fluid. Avoid rinsing with mouthwash during the healing process.

Jewellery worn in tongue frenulum piercings may come into contact with both teeth and gums. This contact can damage both the tooth enamel and the gum tissue over time, and can lead to long term health problems. There is a minute risk that an improperly placed tongue web piercing can damage the sublingual salivatory glands. Like all oral piercings, jewellery worn in a tongue web piercing may be swallowed if it becomes loose in the mouth. Plaque can also build up on this piercing, requiring regular cleaning.

Both ring and barbell style jewellery can be worn in these piercings. Usually the jewellery worn in these piercings is low gauge, as there is not much tissue to pierce or stretch, and larger gauge jewellery may be more likely to damage the teeth and gums.

 

Tongue Piercing

A tongue piercing is a piercing through the tongue. A single piercing the (3-7) days afterwards will occur and can be extremely uncomfortable. Cold, Slurpee-style drinks and sucking on ice will help to mitigate the swelling and soreness, as will ibuprofen. This swelling must be accounted for by using a longer piece of initial jewellery, which is later replaced by a shorter piece of jewellery to prevent the healed piercing from damaging the teeth and gums.

A tongue piercing usually takes 4-6 weeks to fully heal. Aftercare for tongue piercings is more complicated than most other piercings, as the healing piercing will come into contact with anything that enters the mouth, including food and smoke. For these reasons, many certified piercers suggest as after care guidelines, not to engage in oral sex, not to smoke, and to remember rinsing your mouth thoroughly with a particular antiseptic mouthwash recommended by the certified piercer. The piercer should recommend either an alcohol-free mouthwash or diluting a regular mouthwash, as the alcohol will irritate the piercing and slow healing. It is especially important not to play with the piercing during the healing period, because that will severely inhibit the proper healing of the hole.


Tongue piercings are most often pierced with straight barbell style jewellery. Due to the amount of action and movement that the tongue is involved with (speech, eating, kissing, oral sex, etc...), jewellery size and comfort is especially important. Barbells that are too thin are prone to migration, causing discomfort and irritation. Tongue piercings can often be easily stretched to accommodate larger jewellery. The beads at the end of the barbell can be made of many decorative materials, including plastic, but the environment of the mouth can cause cracking and discoloration in the jewellery over time. No-see-um beads, flatter beads matching the color of the tongue are sometimes worn to conceal this piercing, often in places of employment.

An uncommon version of this piercing will be close to the tip of the tongue, and a captive bead ring may be worn in it. This placement and jewellery choice is uncommon because it is much more likely to cause discomfort and damage the teeth and gums.


There is a minor risk of heavy bleeding if a vein is hit; however, a qualified piercer should have no problem avoiding blood vessels. Some bleeding is normal, however, if it cannot be controlled, a medical professional should be contacted.

The piercing has a tendency to heal a bit crooked as a result of the frenulum's placement in the exact center of the tongue. This is usually undetectable by anyone except the piercing's owner, but in some cases it can be quite pronounced.

Tooth and gum damage are risks, but they can be minimized by proper placement, the use of properly-sized jewellery, and avoiding playing with the piercing. A bar that is very large-gauge or too long can greatly increase the risk of chipped teeth or gum erosion, and excessive impacts of the metal against the teeth can cause micro-fractures in the tooth enamel.

Because of the tongue's exceptional natural healing ability, piercings can close very quickly. Even completely healed, very-large-gauge holes can close up completely in a matter of just a few days.

Uvula piercing

A uvula piercing is a body piercing through the uvula. This is a rare piercing, and although the procedure is relatively simple, many piercers may refuse to perform it. The uvula is an extremely vascular piece of tissue, and heals very rapidly. Uvula piercings may reject, leading to the bisection of the uvula, which although unintentional, is harmless.

Piercing the uvula itself is not dangerous, but the procedure must be performed with extreme care. Usually the gag reflex does not prevent this piercing from being worn, but it may make it very difficult to perform, depending on the piercee. Should jewellery pierced through the uvula come loose, it may be swallowed by the bearer.

Captive bead rings are the most commonly seen jewellery in uvula piercings. They are usually small gauge, small diameter rings.

Vertical Labret

A vertical labret is a lip piercing going vertically (as opposed to horizontally) through the lower lip, such that both ends of the barbell are visible. This is not the same as a typical labret (or lip) piercing, where one end of the barbell or stud is outside the mouth between the lower lip and chin, and the other end is inside the mouth.



 

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