Buying an authentic traditional Aboriginal Didgeridoo

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Hi,

I became passionate about the didgeridoo 10 years ago and I woud like to share what I learnt and what pit falls you can avoid as you explore this fascinating and enchanting Australian instrument.

99.9% of all didgeridoos sold on the globl market are not made by an Indigenous Aboriginal in Australia. Traditionally, the didgeridoo, or Yidaki as it is commonly referred to by the Yolngu in NE Arnhem Land, has its origins firmly planted in the Northern tip of Australia. And in West Arnhem Land the instrument is called the Mago. In NE Arnhem Land there is an unbroken tradition of crafting and playing the didgeridoo, the vast majority of Yolngu made Yidaki from NE Arnhem Land are made from 'Stringybark' however, sometimes 'Woolybutt' or 'Bloodwood' is sometimes used. The trees are naturally hollowed out by termites which burrow in to the ground, lay eggs and the larvae eat up the inside of the eucalyptus tree.

If you are hoping to buy an authentic traditional instrument rather than a poor playing copy then you'll need to validate any such claims by the Ebay seller before you invest your money. Ask the seller the name of the crafter, the name of the crafter's clan and the cratfter's location. A reputable seller will be able to give you 100% money back if they are totally passionate and firmly believe in the quality and heritage of the instruments which they are offering to sell to you! Expect nothing less!

If you are looking for a partner in life then it would be a challenge to find someone online if you haven't 'danced' with them first. Likewise, when buying a personal didgeridoo it is vitally important to see how you move together and I would always recommend trying the instrument first. We have over 90 authentic traditional Aboriginal instruments in stock so you can best chose the perfect instrument for you. Everything is sold with a Certificate of Authenticity and we offer full 100% money back if you are not delighted with your purchase. We love the instruments that come through our hands and we unconditionally agree to repair your instrument for free if you have any accident with the instrument, as long as you can get it to us!

Best wishes,

Colin

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