CAUTION: Canon EOS SLRs With Sticky Goo On The Shutter!

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PLEASE BE AWARE: It is very common for earlier Canon EOS SLR 35mm film cameras to have serious problems with the shutter "hanging-up", ruining precious photos and causing major headaches. If this problem has not been professionally fixed, your pictures will come back from the developer with half of the image "cut off" (that portion of the picture will just be BLACK).


The first series of Canon EOS 35mm SLR film cameras have always been cherished by their proud owners. Everyone I have ever met who has owned one simply LOVES IT. These are GREAT cameras with a stellar record of steadfast owner loyalty and satisfaction. However, there is one "fly in the ointment", a sticking shutter problem that affects many of these models at some point.


This trouble is caused by a tiny little rubber part that resides inside the shutter mechanism. It is not easily accessible and will require the services of a certified Canon technician. This little rubber "bumper" can "melt" over time, due to heat, atmospheric conditions and age. 

This  disintegrating little part results in an ugly sticky "goo" that gets on the camera's very delicate "shutter curtains". This problem can easily be seen if you look at the shutter with the film compartment door open (with no film in the camera, of course). That is why it is important for an eBay seller to include a very clear photo of the rear of the camera, with the back wide open, so potential buyers can confirm for themselves that the camera does not suffer from this very common shutter problem.

THE ONLY REASON THESE CAMERAS OFTEN SELL FOR FAR BELOW THEIR TRUE VALUE ON EBAY IS BECAUSE SO MANY PEOPLE HAVE HEARD FRIGHTENING STORIES ABOUT SOMEONE WHO HAS GOTTEN "STUCK" WITH ONE OF THE BAD ONES!


WARNING: MANY  CANON EOS 650 / 620 / 630 / 750 / 850 CAMERAS SOLD ON EBAY HAVE NEVER BEEN PROPERLY REPAIRED TO CORRECT THIS CONDITION, AND THEY ARE VERY LIKELY TO EVENTUALLY FAIL!




This Is The Problem That You Want To Avoid!

As you can see, there are dark black deposits on the shutter curtains in this example. The affected area is almost always found on the left side of the shutter, in a very similar pattern to the example you can see in the picture above.

Since this service costs over £50.00 for professional repairs, this camera must be either used for "replacement parts" or it will simply be thrown out with the rubbish. It would be impossible to justify this expensive repair for an identical camera that can be found in perfect working order, for a lot less money.

EBAY MEMBERS; DO NOT PLACE YOUR BID UNTIL YOU ARE CONVINCED THAT THE THE CAMERA YOU ARE "WATCHING" DOES NOT HAVE THIS PROBLEM.


Be absolutely certain that the Canon EOS Camera that you are thinking about purchasing is free of this very common problem. If there is no clear picture of the shutter displayed on the listing, be sure to ask the seller if the camera has a totally clean shutter.




Canon EOS 650 With A Perfect Shutter

Please, don't let this warning scare you away from these fantastic cameras! It will be well worth the small amount of effort it takes to find one that is working just like brand new. Just be sure that you only buy one that will serve you faithfully, for many, many years to come.



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