Charm Symbolisim

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Wings
 
Wings are the symbol of lightness, spirituality, the possibility of flying and rising up to heaven. Wings are the expression of the aspiration of the soul towards a higher than human condition. Wings are related to the cognitive faculty, imagination, thought, freedom and victory.
According to Hindus, wings are the expression of the freedom to leave earthly things behind as a result of contemplation and to reach Paradise. In ancient Egypt, winged gods were protective gods. They protected creatures, covering them with their wings, as well as surrounding walls, enclosures and temples. In pre-Columbian cultures, wings are associated with the Sun, adopting the form of an eagle in Mexico, and the form of a condor in Peru. In Christian tradition, wings are associated with the light of the Sun of Justice that illuminates the Intelligence of the Just. God protects man with the shadow of his wings. When man separates himself from God, he loses his own original wings. Angels are the purest expression of winged spirit. In Greece, Hermes had winged heels, symbol of the traveller and the messenger, of dreams, of impulse, of movement. The Greeks represented Love and Victory with wings. According to Plato, wings represent Intelligence and Understanding. That is the reason why they are associated with certain fabulous animals, such as Pegasus, representing the sublimation of the specific symbolism of the animal.
 
Goddess
A goddess is a female deity with supernatural powers. Goddesses most often have female characteristics that are apotheosized in their pure form, and some cases they have rather general for all humans characteristics, and other times they can have characteristics that are rather not specific for women like battle and hunting success. They are associated with a wide range phenomena just like male deities, including war, creation and sometimes destruction (and death), life-giving, healing and compassion, they have been especially associated with beauty, love, motherhood and in prehistoric religions and also later with the Earth, fertility.
I have list some of the key area below reference certain aspects of the symbolism of Goddess. I couldn’t put everything in as the listing would go on forever.
  • Mother Earth
There have been systems of religion where the mother is the prime parent, the source of all life; the creator and destroyer. She is the creator of living things, animals, plants, disease etc. Without her there would be nothing. She is the weather, the seas, the land; the soul of the planet.
  • Germanic – Norse/Neo Pagan
Surviving accounts of Germanic mythology and later Norse mythology contain numerous tales and mentions of female goddesses, female giantesses, and divine female figures. The Germanic peoples had altars erected to the "Mothers and Matrons" and held celebrations specific to them (such as the Anglo-Saxon "Mothers-night"), and various other female deities are attested among the Germanic peoples, such as Nerthus attested in an early account of the Germanic peoples, Ēostre attested among the pagan Anglo-Saxons and Sinthgunt attested among the pagan continental Germanic peoples. Examples of goddesses attested in Norse mythology include Frigg (wife of Odin, and the Anglo-Saxon version of whom is namesake of the modern English weekday Friday), Skaði (one time wife of Njörðr), Njerda (Scandinavian name of Nerthus), that also was married to Njörðr during Bronze Age, Freyja (wife of Óðr), Sif (wife of Thor), Gerðr (wife of Freyr), and personifications such as Jörð (earth), Sól (the sun), and Nótt (night). Female deities also play heavily into the Norse concept of death, where half of those slain in battle enter Freyja's field Fólkvangr, Hel receives the dead in her realm of the same name, and Rán receives those who die at sea.
  • Celtic
The Celts honoured goddesses of nature and natural forces, as well as those connected with skills and professions such as healing, warfare and poetry. The Celtic goddesses have diverse qualities such as abundance, creation and beauty, as well as harshness, slaughter and vengeance. They have been depicted as beautiful or hideous, old hags or young women, and at times may transform their appearance from one state to another, or into their associated creatures such as crows, cows, wolves or eels, to name but a few. In Irish mythology in particular, tutelary goddesses are often associated with sovereignty and various features of the land, notably mountains, rivers, forests and holy wells.
  • Wicca
In Wicca "the Goddess" is a deity of prime importance, along with her consort the Horned God. Within many forms of Wicca the Goddess has come to be considered as a universal deity, more in line with her description in the Charge of the Goddess, a key Wiccan text. In this guise she is the "Queen of Heaven", similar to Isis. She also encompasses and conceives all life, much like Gaia. Similarly to Isis and certain late Classical conceptions of Selene, she is the summation of all other goddesses, who represent her different names and aspects across the different cultures. The Goddess is often portrayed with strong lunar symbolism, drawing on various cultures and deities such as Diana, Hecate, and Isis, and is often depicted as the Maiden, Mother and Crone
 
Pentagram
The pentagram has been used as a religious symbol throughout the world from the beginning of recorded history. The most basic pentagram is simply a five-point star drawn with one continuous line broken into five line segments and with one point of the star facing up. Today, however, when we say “pentagram,” we usually mean “a five-point star with one or two circles drawn around it. An inverted pentagram displays the star “upside down,” i.e., with one point facing down and two facing up. Whichever form is used, the pentagram has always been assigned a five-part symbolism.
The five points within a pentagram have their own meaning. The upward point of the star is representative of the spirit. The other four points all represent an element; earth, air, fire, and water. All these things contribute to life and are a part of each of us. The number 5 has always been regarded as mystical and magical, yet essentially 'human'. We have five fingers & toes. We commonly note five senses: sight, hearing, smell, touch and taste. We perceive five stages or initiations in our lives: birth, adolescence, coitus, parenthood and death.
It has been used throughout the ages as a sign of protection in all manner of speaking, but specifically against ‘Evil’ (I don’t like that word however it fits!) It can be found in Viking jewellery, cave paintings, temples across the globe and many more.

Hasma Hand
The Hand (Khamsa), particularly the open right hand, is a sign of protection that also represents blessings, power and strength, and is seen as potent in deflecting the evil eye. One of the most common components of gold and silver jewellery in the region, historically and traditionally, it was most commonly carved in jet or formed from silver, a metal believed to represent purity and hold magical properties. It is also painted in red (sometimes using the blood of a sacrificed animal) on the walls of houses for protection,or painted or hung on the doorways of rooms, such as those of an expectant mother or new baby. The hand can be depicted with the fingers spread apart to ward off evil, or as closed together to bring good luck
 
Om 
Om is a sacred sound and a spiritual icon in Dharmic religions. It is also a mantra in Hinduism, Buddism and janinism. In Hinduism, Om is a spiritual symbol (pratima) referring to Atman (soul, self within) and Brahman (ultimate reality, entirety of the universe, truth, divine, supreme spirit, cosmic principles, knowledge).
The syllable is one of the most important symbols in Hinduism,and is often found at the beginning and the end of chapters in the Vedas, the Upanishads, and other Hindu texts. It is a sacred spiritual incantation made before and during the recitation of spiritual texts, during puja and private prayers and during meditative and spiritual activities such as Yoga.
Om is part of the iconography found in ancient and medieval era temples, monasteries and spiritual retreats in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.


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