Cleaning Silver Coins (Without Destroying Them!)

Views 2 Likes Comments Comment
Like if this guide is helpful
This Victorian Shilling, dated 1887, was stained brown and black before cleaning. You could hardly see it.
Link to an eBay page Remove
Add up to 3 more photos
Link to an eBay page
This Victorian Shilling, dated 1887, was stained brown and black before cleaning. You could hardly see it.

Black. Stained. Dirty. All of these words could be used to describe my shilling, pictured above, when I bought it for £3. I got it so cheap because you could hardly see what it was behind so much grease and muck from over 100 years ago! Cleaned, I sold it for over 4 times the price.

So, how do you get a dirty silver coin to look like the one above?

The secret is bicarbonate of soda. This is available in virtually every supermarket. You need to put the coin in one hand, a large lump of bicarb in the other, and use your fingers to rub it into the coin, working into every detail. The dirt literally comes off in your hands! The process should take a few minutes, and you can also use salt to speed it up. Proceed to dry the coin thoroughly.

That is it. How simple? 

Of course I should always point out that it's probably not best to do this with really valuable coins, or coins that are already clean, or coins that are "toned" nicely, so there isn't actually any dirt, but you already know this.

Good luck with your cleaning!

from treasuredcoinsuk
Have something to share, create your own guide... Write a guide
Explore more guides