Do You Own One of These Future Classic Cars?

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Even if you sold your car a week after you bought it brand new, you would have to knock a few hundred or even thousand pounds off the price you paid for it, as it’s no longer brand new. Cars will continue to depreciate in value annually whilst the same make and model remains in production. Once the car stops being made, very occasionally, something special happens: that car starts to become sought after. Its value starts to rise again; it enters the collector’s market and is well on its way to becoming a classic.

These are the cars tipped to make you money in the future.

The Mazda MX-5

With what has become the archetypal, traditional sports-car body shape, combined with a now well-tested reliability, this sleek two-seater is forecast to be one of those few vehicles that will still gather a crowd of admirers two decades from now. Second-hand models can be picked up relatively cheaply. To get best value, look for a well-cared for nineties model, which can be found for under £2,000. Treat it well and fingers crossed it will pay you back handsomely in years to come.
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The Audi TT Coupé

The Audi TT Coupé is one of those rare stand-out design cars that still gets admiring glances, despite being on the roads since the 1990s. Whilst it’s been tweaked over the years, its iconic, almost cartoon-like, sweeping curves and distinct shape remain. You can pick up a two or three-year-old model that’s done around 50,000 miles for about half its new list price. Move back into the twentieth century, however, and you can find this timeless icon changing hands at well under £5,000. As they become rarer, however, these values will probably begin to rise again.
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The Renaultsport Clio 182

This supermini hot-hatch last rolled off the production line just over ten years ago, but its rapid acceleration and nippy handling means that it has never lost its allure to British driving enthusiasts - Britain bought more of these cars than any other nation. In fact, Renault built a limited edition Trophy model solely for its loyal UK fan base. With around 100,000 miles on the clock, these cars are fetching between £2-3,000. Good value if, as heavily predicted, they are set to become collectibles.

The Jaguar XK

In its coupé and convertible incarnations, the Jaguar XK manages to combine the spaciousness of a luxury grand tourer with the speed and aerodynamism of a sports car. Most people could only dream of owning this new, but now that it’s only available on the used market it is within a lot more people’s reach. A 2007 model with around 70,000 miles on the clock can be found for around £15,000. If you can garage it overnight and treat it well, it should at least pay you back a few years from now.
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The Toyota Prius

It might not be hip. It won’t stick out from the pack in a supermarket car park. It’s not even that fast or well-equipped. It was a world first, however. Having the accolade of the first mass-market hybrid electric/petrol car is enough to propel it into classic car territory. The sought after models are most likely to be the first to hit the road in the late 1990s, which rarely sell for more than £2,000.
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