Edison bulbs and bulb type explained.

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A guide to buying vintage lighting and edison bulbs.

It can be so confusing to know whether you are buying the correct bulb for your lights I decided to write a short guide in simple english to explain.
Your average UK bulb holder is whats knows as a bayonet cap BC. With its familiar “push and twist” action, “bayonet cap” (also known as BC or B22d) is used on most regular light bulbs. It is 22mm diameter and with two locating lugs. The vintage bulbs that are so popular at the moment are edison screw ES. I assume most for sale are ES because most of the world have ES fittings. Named after the pioneering inventor Thomas Edison, the Edison Screw or “ES” lamp fitting is used worldwide in a vast range of applications.

The most popular ES or E27 fitting is 27mm diameter and is widely used in both the US and Europe. So if you want to get a vintage edison type bulb you will need an ES fitting not a BC. The only other thing you will need to consider when purchasing is what type of filament you want (the inside bit that glows) and what bulb shape you would like.
I do hope you have found this guide helpful and enjoy buying your vintage lighting. The glow given off from these vintage bulbs is just fantastic!
This is a spiral filament standard shape vintage bulb
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This is a spiral filament standard shape vintage bulb
This is a squirrel cage filament globe shaped vintage bulb
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This is a squirrel cage filament globe shaped vintage bulb
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This is a squirrel filament in a radio tube valve shape vintage bulb
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This is a squirrel filament in a radio tube valve shape vintage bulb
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