Espresso coffee machine servicing - commercial machines

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DID YOU FIND THIS REVIEW BECAUSE YOU ARE TRYING TO FIND SOMEONE TO REPAIR OR SERVICE YOUR COMMERCIAL ESPRESSO COFFEE MACHINE? YOU ARE IN THE COMPANY OF MANY OTHERS!

When you consider buying a new commercial espresso coffee machine make set-up and servicing the number one priority!

We regularly see poorly serviced equipment that are potentially dangerous! and often making awful coffee!

Ask your supplier if they have their own engineers? do they stock all the spare parts for the machine? - can you take a look! do they have spare machines if they can't fix yours? There are now hundreds of machine manufacturers, often making several models that are constantly being updated/altered - spares can be a problem. Be wary of companies that don't have their own engineers - how soon will the turn up if something goes wrong, would an engineer from another company be familiar with the coffee being used, important points.

These types of machine are normally "Pressure Vessels" and there are laws regarding their safe use! You may well be personally liable as an employer and will have to answer some difficult questions if one of your staff or customers are injured.

MAKE SURE YOUR NEW MACHINE COMES WITH ALL CORRECT PAPERWORK/CERTIFICATES, REPAIRS ARE CARRIED OUT ON TIME, BOILER INSPECTIONS ARE CARRIED OUT WHEN DUE AND THERE IS A "WRITTEN SCHEME" IN PLACE DETAILING WORK CARRIED OUT AND SERVICING DUE!

Apart from the safety issues, your new machine will need to be set-up, ask your coffee supplier to check your machine regularly - ask for free training for your staff. Get details of your coffee blend, how long should it take to make an espresso coffee? what colour should the "crema" be? what size filters suit your cups? what pressure is the pump set at...? plenty of information should be available.

We service lots of coffee machines and know that many people are not aware of the risks or the safety issues with regard to espresso coffee machines - some have been given incorrect information from their suppliers. Contact a company that specialises in inspections to get more information - try looking under "Plant Safety" in the Yellow Pages. This should provide you with some local compaies that specialise in inspecting pressurised vessels.

It's an issue that you can't afford to over-look. No-one in their right mind would want to see anyone get hurt when these machines are in use - or be taken to court because of an injury - any pressurised vessel is a potential bomb - no kidding!

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