Guide to Dating Curt Teich Postcards Linen Post Cards

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Guide to Dating Curt Teich Postcards Linen Post Cards
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Curt Otto Teich  who immigrated to the United States from Lobenstein, Germany, in 1896, founded the Curt Teich Company of Chicago, which operated from 1898 to 1978 as the world's largest printer of view and advertising postcards.

Guide to Dating Curt Teich Postcards

The first series of cards printed by the Teich Company used numbers only and ranged from 1 – 14989.
The production dates were not recorded by the company at this time, but from copyright dates found on
some of the cards, it has been determined that these cards were produced between 1900 and 1908.

1900–1908

1 – 14989

The next card series began with either A or R  and were numbered from 1–124180. From 1908
until 1913, production dates are not clear and were determined by copyright dates found on a few of the
cards. These numbers and dates should be used only as a guide. After 1913, dates began to appear
occasionally in the order books kept by the company, and from 1922 on, production dates were well
documented. The letter A has been used as the standard.

1908–1928
1908-1910 A1 1919 A77482 – A81999
1910 A19922 1920 A82000 – A83599
1911 A22998 1921 A83600 – A87975
1912 A32000 1922 A87976 – A92873
1913 A32236 – A45599 1923 A92874 – A96826
1914 A45600 – A5399 1924 A96827 – A102410
1915 A54000 – A61999 1925 A102411 – A107826
1916 A62000 – A71999 1926 A107827 – A112867
1917 A72000 – A77320 1927 A112868 – A118311
1918 A77321 – A77481 1928 A118312 – A124180

There are a few hundred cards ordered by the Woolworth Company that begin with a W instead of
the more typical A or R. It is believed that in some cases the same view was ordered from the Teich
Company by another customer, and the card was printed with A or R preceding the number. A small
number of cards also filed with this series begin with BS, DT, RG, and RT. After approximately
1924, the A or R may not appear on the card at all.

A -N printed on the postcard after the production number indicates it was a reprinted card. Reports
printed from the Teich Archives database may show other alpha characters (X, Y, Z) after the number
which usually indicates it has been computer cataloged under more than one subject heading. However,
early Teich postcards and V.O. Hammon postcards sometimes used the same number on two different
views, and an A or B has been added by the Archives to the end of the production number.


During the years 1929 and 1930, another new system was started. The company used the number of the
card and then a  followed by the year

1929–1930
1929 1-29 – 6262-29
1930 1-30 – 2934-30

In the middle of the -30 series, the numbering system was again changed. A letter would denote the
decade (A – 1930s, B – 1940s, C- 1950s, D – 1960s, E – 1970s), and the number before the letter
would indicate the year within that decade. Thus the next card printed after 2934-30 was 0A2935. In
1931 a new printing process was developed, and this style added another letter after the decade letter.
An H was added if the card was printed using the Art Colortone Method also called linen cards.
Later, a K was used, beginning in the late 1940s, to indicate Curteichcolor which is a chrome
postcard printing process. From the 1930s through the 1970s, the following numbers were used:

1931–1978
1930 0A2935 – 0A5363
1931 1A1 – 1A3637 1AH1 – 1AH565
1932 2A1 – 2A1562 2AH1 – 2AH1082
1933 3A1 – 3A552 3AH1 – 3AH1656
1934 4A1 – 4A654 4AH1 – 4AH2223
1935 5A1 – 5A650 5AH1 – 5AH2701
1936 6A1 – 6A668 6AH1 – 6AH2913
1937 7A1 – 7A710 7AH1 – 7AH3989
1938 8A1 – 8A923 8AH1 – 8AH3291
1939 9A1 – 9A982 9AH1 – 9AH2637
1940 0B1 – OB996 0BH1 – 0BH2755
1941 1B1 – 1B954 1BH1 – 1BH2693
1942 2B1 – 2B545 2BH1 – 2BH1581
1943 3B1 – 3B432 3BH1 – 3BH1722
1944 4B1 – 4B436 4BH1 – 4BH1657
1945 5B1 – 5B510 5BH1 – 5BH1509
1946 6B1 – 6B721 6BH1 – 6BH2667
1947 7B1 – 7B561 7BH1 – 7BH2149
1948 8B1 – 8B791 8BH1 – 8BH1993
1949 9B1 – 9B782 9BH1 – 9BH1904 9BK1 – 9BK129
19500C1 – 0C700 0CH1 – 0CH2125 0CK1 – 0CK448
19511C1 – 1C653 1CH1 – 1CH1937 1CK1 – 1CK305 1CP1450 – 1CP2030
19522C1 – 2C564 2CH1 – 2CH1680 2CK1 – 2CK401 2CP2001 – 2CP2638
19533C1 – 3C494 3CH1 – 3CH1433 3CK1 – 3CK1548 3CP2001 – 3CP2254
1954 4C1 – 4C420 4CH1 – 4CH909 4CK1 – 4CK2194 4CP2001 – 2CP2109
1955 5C1 – 5C230 5CH1 – 5CH705 5CK1 – 5CK3091 5CP2001 – 5CP2049
1956 6C1 – 6C100 6CH1 – 6CH228 6CK1 – 6CK3110 6CP2001 – 6CP2022
1957 7C1 – 7C8 7CH1 – 7CH92 7CK1 – 7CK3151
1958 8CH1 – 8CH62 8CK1 – 8CK3280
1959 9CH1 – 9CH6 9CK1 – 9CK3023
1960 0DK1 – 0DK2443
1961 1DK1 – 1DK2385
1962 2DK1 – 2DK2073
1963 3DK1 – 3DK2035
1964 4DK1 – 4DK1936  The P indicates the C.T. Photochrom process. Most of the cards
1965 5DK1 – 5DK2006 printed with this new process were reprints of cards the Teich Company
1966 6DK1 – 6DK1957
1967 7DK1 – 7DK1795 produced in other styles.
1968 8DK1 – 8DK1477
1969 9DK1 – 9DK1330 In 1974 the Teich Company was sold to Regensteiner Publishers also
in Chicago. The Teich Company continued to operate in the same
1970 0EK1 – 0EK885 building and continued printing Teich postcards until 1978 when the
1971 1EK1 – 1EK785 plant closed. The ‘ED’ series postcards are Curteichcolor 3-D natural
1972 2EK1 – 2EK699
1973 3EK1 – 3EK561
color reproduction and are international size
1974 4EK1 – 4EK392 4ED1 – 4ED558
1975 5EK1 – 5EK537 5ED1 – 5ED981
1976 6EK1 – 6EK689 6ED1 – 6ED954
1977 7EK1 – 7EK454 7ED1 – 7ED368
1978 8EK1 – 8EK116 8ED1 – 8ED187

 


In 1929 another series of cards originated referred to as the D series. This series consists of different
types of printed pieces, although many of the early numbers are postcards. Other types of materials
include: blotters, brochures, pamphlets, letterheads, envelopes, souvenir booklets, fold-out postcards,
and oversize advertising pieces.

D Series

1929 D1- D558 1952 D9972 – D10203
1930 D559 – D1100 1953 D10204 – D10431
1931 D1101 – D1720 1954 D10432 – D10713
1932 D1721 – D2400 1955 D10714 – D11134
1933 D2401 – D3200 1956 D11135 – D11600
1934 D3201 – D3650 1957 D11601 – D11935
1935 D3651 – D4200 1958 D11936 – D12352
1936 D4201 – D4750 1959 D12353 – D12772
1937 D4751 – D5200 1960 D12773 – D13075
1938 D5201 – D5700 1961 D13076 – D13355
1939 D5701 – D6200 1962 D13356 – D13612
1940 D6201 – D6470 1963 D13613 – D13822
1941 D6471 – D6790 1964 D13823 – D14095
1942 D6791 – D7090 1965 D14096 – D14390
1943 D7091 – D7435 1966 D14391 – D14796
1944 D7436 – D7685 1967 D14797 – D15261
1945 D7686 – D8000 1968 D15262 – D15684  The company continued printing D cards after it
1946 D8001 – D8492 1969 D15685 – D16231 was sold in 1974, but the new orders were not written
1947 D8493 – D8741 1970 D16232 – D17000 in the company books. The last D card printed

1948 D8742 – D9105 1971 D17001 – D17770

before the plant closed in 1978 was D20363.

1949 D9106 – D9450 1972 D17771 – D18600
1950 D9451 – D9725 1973 D18601 – D19325
1951 D9726 – D9971 1974–1978 D19326 – D20363

Several smaller series of postcards were printed at the same time as the main series of cards. One group
began with two letters before the number of the card. These two letters could be AD, AC, AH, AP, AS,
RC, RD, RH, RP, RS, WC, OR WP. The second letter in the code often indicates the process – the C
usually means C.T. Colorchrome, D – Doubletone, S – Sepia, H – C.T. Handcolored. RC has
been used below as the standard. The dates for this series are approximate and were derived from the
company records or from copyright dates on the postcards.

RC Cards 1912– 1925

1912 RC1 – RC360 1919 RC10567 – RC12318
1913 RC361 – RC1800 1920
1914 RC1801 – RC4500 1921
1915 RC4501 – RC6680 1922
1916 RC6681 – RC8842 1923 RC12637 – RC14175
1917 RC8843 – RC10193 1924 RC14176 – RC14528
1918 RC10194 – RC10566 1925 RC14529 – RC14804

 


The series of cards known as C cards were printed approximately between 1905 and 1926. Not much
is known about this series because many numbers were not entered in the company records and few
were recorded with a date. Many of the cards in the files are printers proofs – not finished cards. Many
of the backs of the finished cards are printed with a brown (sepia) tone. There are a number of different
styles in this series which include: Octochrome, Commercialchrome, and Sky-tint, but there may be
others. In some cases, the C or even a CC may follow the production number or may not be present
at all.

The few dates found for these cards have been mostly from copyright dates that appear on the cards. In
a few cases there were notes written by Teich employees which indicated a date. The following dates
are approximate

Special Series 1905–1926

1905 C1 1916 C48476
1906 C4235 1917 C51320 – C52372
1907 1918
1908 1919
1909 C4644 1920
1910 C7315 – C8060 1921 C56466
1911 1922
1912 C22152 1923
1913 C31916 1924
1914 1925 – C61608
1915 C37088 1926 C61609 – C63517

Other series of cards printed by the Teich Company which are not included at this time are: L printed
for the Hugh C. Leighton Company, Portland, Maine; ‘AQ’ printed mainly for Fred Harvey; and E,
B,  cards which are miniature views.

Dates for the V.O. Hammon postcards are not included on this list, but the V.O. Hammon Publishing
Company, publisher of pictorial postcards, is listed in the Minneapolis, Minnesota city directory from
1904 until 1923.

this guide was written with the assistance of the Curt-Teich postcard archives.

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