HOW TO BREW A PERFECT CUP OF TEA

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HOW TO BREW A PERFECT CUP OF TEA


A beginner’s guide to brewing different types of tea

[tea-types]

Different teas require different brewing. Although essentially from the same plant (camellia senensis), tea is manufactured using a variety of processes to produce a wide range of teas such as black, green, oolong and pu-erh. It is this processing which affects their sensitivity to hot water and how it should be brewed.

The more delicate, less oxidised teas such as green and white are best brewed at lower temperatures, whilst black teas should be brewed at higher temperatures around 100 C˚. We often hear people say that they tried green tea, but didn’t like it and found too harsh or bitter. This is generally due to an incorrect brewing method – water too hot or steeped for too long.

Whilst we don’t want to make this sound like a science, following a few simple guidelines will allow you to enjoy your teas to the maximum and fill you with confidence to explore wonderful new teas and brew them correctly.

There are three basic elements to be considered in brewing tea:

The amount of tea used
Water temperature
Brewing/Steeping Time.

Tea should always be made with freshly drawn water. Never use re-boiled water.

Ultimately, it comes down to personal taste, so these are only suggested guidelines. Feel free to experiment yourself to find your favourite cup of perfectly brewed tea.
* Tip – For a stronger tea, add more tea to the brew. Do not steep for longer.

Tea Type

Amount of Tea

Temperature

Brewing time

Black Tea (e.g.English Breakfast, Ceylon, Assam, Keemun etc) 1 teaspoon per person Boiling 3-4 minutes
Oolong 1 teaspoon per person Boiled water allowed to cool for 2-3 minutes. 3 minutes
Green 1 teaspoon per person Boiled water allowed to cool for 3-4 minutes. 3-5 minutes
White 1 ½ teaspoon per person Boiled water allowed to cool for 3-4 minutes. 4-5 minutes
Pu-Erh 1 teaspoon per person Boiling 3-4 minutes
 
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