How Much Is Your Sports Memorabilia Worth?

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Do you have a football shirt from the '70s gathering dust in your wardrobe? A towel once used to wipe the brow of Muhammad Ali? Or the world’s biggest collection of Torquay United match day programmes?

If so, you could be sitting on an absolute goldmine (well, maybe not with that last one)...
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Football Shirts

The price of brand new football shirts can be pretty staggering, but that's nothing compared to how much shirts worn by famous players can fetch. 

The world-record price for a football shirt is the £157,750 sale of Pelé’s 1970 World Cup winning shirt. It was sold by Italian international Roberto Rosato – who was savvy enough to swap shirts with the Brazilian superstar after Brazil’s 4-1 victory in Mexico City.

The money probably goes some way to making up for the ignominy of having Pelé run rings around him for 90 minutes. 
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Got… Got… Need!

We all remember spending hours in the playground doing swapsies in the hope of completing a Panini or Merlin sticker album. But, we probably didn’t realise at the time that securing that David May shiny would one day prove to be a sound financial investment. 

Completed albums can go for £60 or more on eBay, meaning you can finally prove your parents wrong with their protestations that it was a waste of time and money. 
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Olympic Torch

Eight thousand of these were given to torch bearers as part of the London 2012 Olympic Torch Relay. But if you weren’t lucky enough to be chosen, you can buy one and pretend for between £3,500 and £7,000.

An Olympic torch from the 1956 Games in Melbourne will set you back a pretty hefty £11,500, but if there’s a cooler way to light the barbecue when you have friends round, we’d like to see it. 
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Love the Glove

A single boxing glove may not be much use in a fight, but, if it's been worn by a prominent pugilist, it could add some punch to your bank account. 

A glove signed by someone like Ricky Hatton or Carl Froch will fetch around £130. While gloves worn by Muhammad Ali can go for hundreds of thousands – even without a signature. 
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Golden Balls

Golf balls have a hard life, don’t they? Repeatedly hit at 150 miles per hour with the sole aim of making them go into a cramped, dark hole. And then – even when they do something amazing, such as win The Open Championship – their owner throws them away by way of thanks. 

If you’re fortunate enough to catch one thrown by a tour pro, hold onto it. The ball Rory McIlroy used to win the 2014 Open sold for £31,004, less than a month later. We hope it’s living a happy life in a comfy display cabinet now. 
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Subbuteo Spondoolies

Our memories of the football game Subbuteo are spending hours painstakingly preparing the stadium – only to realise that a crease down one side of the pitch where it’s been folded away has made the surface less playable than a pub team’s pitch after a heavy downpour. 

If you’ve still got yours neatly boxed away, it’s well worth seeing how much it could fetch you. Certain teams – boxed and in good condition – will sell for as much as £150. That’s not a bad return, considering they probably cost less than a fiver when they were new. 
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Sign Here

The value of autographs from sporting stars can vary greatly (from £5 to millions), depending on factors such as the level of the sports star, whether you have a certificate that proves they signed it, and – quite morbidly – whether they’re still around. 

You won’t be able to retire to the Seychelles on the proceeds from selling a splodgy squiggle that looks like it might belong to Emile Heskey. But, a verified autograph from baseball legend Babe Ruth can fetch up to $1m. If it’s on a piece of sporting memorabilia, such as a bat or whatnot, then you’re laughing all the way to the bank.  
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Get With the Programme

When you look at a wine list and see something that’s older than your parents, you know you either need to steer clear or be prepared for your credit card to take a big hit. It’s the same story with football programmes.

As a general rule, the older they are, the more they’re worth. An FA Cup final programme from the 1920s can reach over £1,500, while more recent programmes from the '70s can go for as much as £500, if they are sufficiently rare. 
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Looking for More Seriously Cool Sports Memorabilia?

Check out some of the best pieces of European football memorabilia, and take inspiration from the stories behind these game-changing sports jerseys...
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