How To Make Brilliant Bath Bombs

Like if this guide is helpful
Edit Link Remove
Add up to 3 more photos

Who doesn’t love a  good bath bomb? After a long day, nothing feels better than sinking into a candyfloss-coloured, luxurious explosion of bubbles.

Close your eyes, and you’ll almost feel like you’re in a five-star spa. Sans the hefty price tag, of course. And how to make it cheaper, still? Make your own bath bombs!

It’s good for the environment, customisable to exactly what you’re after during your big soak, and far more purse-friendly.

Glittered or technicolour, sensually aromatic or sweet enough to eat, here’s your guide to creating the most brilliant of DIY bath bombs...
Image by Pinterest/Something Turquoise
Edit Link Remove
Add up to 3 more photos
Image by Pinterest/Something Turquoise

Your Shopping List

The good news? Pretty much all of the ingredients you need are pretty common household items.

A good rummage in the pantry or at the back of the bathroom cupboards might be necessary, otherwise ingredients are cheap and mostly easy to find at the local shop.

Here’s a simple shopping list below to get you started, split into both dry and wet ingredients.

Dry Ingredients
- Baking soda
- Corn starch
- Citric acid
- Dead sea/mineral salts

Wet Ingredients
- Water
- Essential oils (Try vanilla, lavender or ginger – they have lots of different properties we’ll talk through)
- Vegetable oil
- Food colouring (Any colour, use a mixture for pastels or crazier hues)

Plus: a bath bomb mould (Christmas tree ornament holders, ice cube trays, anything that will hold the shape.)
Edit Link Remove
Add up to 3 more photos

Getting Started On Your Bath Bombs

Put all your dry ingredients – 1½ cups of baking soda, ½ cup of corn starch, ½ cup citric acid and ½ cup of salts – in one bowl, and whisk until smooth.

Then take another bowl and combine all of the wet ingredients – 1 tablespoon of water, 2 tablespoons of the essential oil of your choice, 1 tablespoon of oil, and 10 or 15 drops of food colouring.

When you add the food colouring first, it will look very, very dark. As it sets, the colour will lighten.

Try mixing different colours to get your desired shade: Approximately 10 drops of red and 5 drops of yellow will create a really lovely peach tone.

Top tip: Corn starch can sometimes irritate cuts or open wounds, so substitute it with  coconut oil if you need to.
Image by Pixabay
Edit Link Remove
Add up to 3 more photos
Image by Pixabay

Getting the Aroma Just Right

Don’t be afraid to get creative – it’s easy to add in little bits and pieces to make unique bath bombs.

Different essential oils wield different properties.  Relaxing lavender oil will help you sleep, basil oil is great for a cold, soothing coriander helps with aches and pains, calming frankincense is helpful for anxiety while citronella aids fatigue. Otherwise, just pick what smells great.

We love the combination of jasmine oil and sandalwood, or vanilla and apricot oil.

Top tip: To find the perfect scent, try experimenting with oils in a separate bowl first, using your nose as a guide.
Image by Wikimedia Commons
Edit Link Remove
Add up to 3 more photos
Image by Wikimedia Commons

Getting the Combo Just Right

Next, combine all the ingredients in one bowl, adding more food colouring as you go.

This can make the mixture fizz, so be sure to add a drop at a time and stir regularly. The more it fizzes while you mix, the less it will fizz in the bath, so be careful!
Image by Wikimedia Commons
Edit Link Remove
Add up to 3 more photos
Image by Wikimedia Commons

Jazzing Up Your Brilliant Bath Bombs

At this stage, you can add little things to give your bath bombs some texture.

Take a handful of  dried flowers, potpourri, rosemary sprigs, basil or body glitter (make sure it’s non-toxic) and sprinkle into your mix.
Link to an eBay page Remove
Add up to 3 more photos
Link to an eBay page

Setting the Bath Bombs

Adding witch hazel can help set the mixture, but be careful not to use too much otherwise it'll be fizz-overload!

Use a little bottle and spray your mixture a few times lightly.  You’ll know you’re done when you’re able to meld the mixture into shapes with your hands. If it’s too wet or crumbly, you aren’t done mixing just yet.

Then add your concoction to your mould. Softer structures, like silicone muffin tins work best, because they’re less likely to crack as they set. This means you can experiment with shapes too – hearts, stars, or huge spherical, wondrous creations.

Add some oil to the trays so the bath bombs don’t crack, and pack the mixture in as tight as possible. Leave them to set for 24 hours in a cool, dry place.

Once they're ready, bang the moulds against the table to set your little creations free.
Image by Pixabay
Edit Link Remove
Add up to 3 more photos

Storing Your Creations

You’ve made your own beautiful bath bombs and now you need something pretty to store them in.

Keep them in a cool, dry place, away from water so your bathroom doesn’t resemble a laboratory explosion when they start fizzing everywhere. Try containers for sweets and chocolate, or sheer, delicate bags that you can tie with curly pieces of ribbon to give to others.

They’re perfect as gifts, or when you need a little pick-me-up-yourself.
Link to an eBay page Remove
Add up to 3 more photos
Link to an eBay page
Have something to share, create your own guide... Write a guide
Explore more guides