RUBBER STAMPING & BRUSH MARKERS

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When I first started stamping, I didn't know that there were alternatives to ink pads .
I felt really limited by only being able to stamp and then colour in. Quite often, I wanted multi-coloured images but didn't like the multi-colour pads available.
THEN I DISCOVERED BRUSH MARKERS AND CHALKS (I cover Chalks in my HOW TO GUIDE - BLENDING CHALKS & RUBBER STAMPS) AND THERE HAS BEEN NO LOOKING BACK!

THIS IS A QUICK AND SIMPLE TIPS AND TECHNIQUES ON BRUSH MARKERS AND RUBBER STAMPING.



Outline stamps are line art illustrations. These stamps are ideally suited to quick and easy ink with an ink pad and then coloured in with pencils, chalks, brush markers etc.You can, of course, also use brush markers to colour direct on to this kind of stamp as well -  on dual tip brush markers, the larger, art end, would be ideally suited to this.

                                                                                               



Bold stamps are those with solid areas or silhouette shapes. These images quite often have the greatest impact if  the image is stamped in multiple colours. This is most easily achieved and allows  you to make specific colour choices if done with water based Brush  Markers - again this is best achieved with the wider tip on a dual-tip brush marker.
Using the colours you have selected, ink directly on to the rubber, ensuring that you cover all raised areas of your chosen design. Always start with the lightest colour first and work your way through applying the darkest colour of your selection last. This should help prevent the tips of your Brush markers getting cross-colour 'contamination.'

                                                                                            


                        If you don't already have Brush Markers consider these Dovecraft Markers. They are an excellent quality but extremely affordable option in dual-tip brush markers, capable of the same finishes but much cheaper than many other options such as Whispers.



As with most crafting techniques, you need to experiment and find what works best for you as, despite what I have said above, practise will show that there are times when Brush markers will work excellent with both simple and more complex outline stamp images (the picture for the more complex image I have included has been further finished with chalks - always remember that colour mediums can be mixed when compatible.)



Just be sure to follow the basic steps:

1. Apply desired colour to the stamp


2. To produce a more vivid impression, activate the colours on the stamp by breathing on it for 5-10 seconds.


3.Stamp your image


An example of a more complex design





FURTHER TIPS ON COLOURING DIRECT ONTO YOUR RUBBER STAMPS:

1. When colouring directly on to a rubber stamp you can get more than one image from one colouring by first inking the stamp with clear embossing ink before adding the colour with your markers. You should be able to get two or three images before needing to re-ink. This also offers you the added versatility of embossing the image (best, if done with clear embossing powder!)

2. You can usually get more than one image from one colouring by lightly spritzing the surface of the stamp with a 'mist' of water.

3. You can simply, easily and quickly achieve a crisp monotone look by using brush markers on outline stamps (described above.)  Ink the outline with the  broad tip of your Brush Marker direct to the rubber and stamp your image. Then use a blender pen on paint brush and water and 'pull' the colour from the outline of the stamped image to the inside of the image. Your image will then be totally coloured in shades of one colour giving a great monotone effect!

4. REMEMBER: do not use permanent markers direct to rubber stamp as they dry too quickly and will stain your image and there is also the possibility of colour transference from the stain should you use the stamp again.



REMEMBER: If colouring a large rubber stamp or a complicated design, try to work quickly but neatly as you want the ink to remain 'wet.' Even with your best efforts, the ink may dry before you are finished colouring. Not to worry, simply breathe onto the coloured stamp to 'reactivate' the ink (you may see this called 'huffing') and then stamp your image.



AS ALWAYS HAPPY CRAFTING FROM ALL OF US AT EZEEPZEESHOPPING!
DO VISIT THE SHOP FOR ALL YOUR RUBBER STAMPING, INK PADS, MARKERS & CHALKS

   




Please note that this guide is based solely on water based markers. This ink is not water resistant and is great for blending either with a blender pen or paintbrush and water. It also means that the colours can be 'blurred' into each other when this is needed for your project.

There are also pigment markers and wet look markers available on the market but I don't have much experience/knowledge of these and that's why I haven't included them.

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