Retro Style Lamps To Brighten Up Your Autumn

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Good lighting means lamps, not eyeball-busting central pendant lights that only spotlight your less than perfect décor. Lamps reflect your personality and classic and retro designs always provide a classy look. Check out our top 10 retro-inspired designs that will delight and illuminate.
The simplest of all lamps... perfect paper
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The simplest of all lamps... perfect paper

10. Paper lamp

The humble paper light shade. It’s been around forever and has endured the test of time admirably. For a budget option you can’t go wrong with a column floor lamp made out of paper. They are available in a range of pretty colours as well as classic white. For a slightly upmarket version, opt for a wooden framed lamp with a cute design printed on the paper shade in black, in the Asian tradition.
Icy cool... the cube lamp
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Icy cool... the cube lamp

9. The cube

Cube lights can have a vintage feel when teamed with a little wooden or chrome base, or an ultra-modern feel when designed as a pure white cube. Simplicity itself, this style of lamp will look good anywhere around the home. To add an element of sparkle, opt for a glass multi-faceted “ice” cube, which will add more surfaces to reflect the light. 
Standard lamp... a modern classic
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Standard lamp... a modern classic

8. Standard lamp

No longer the sole preserve of a turned pine column with a flowery lampshade atop, the standard lamp has evolved into a modern classic. From the simplest chrome pole with a white opaque uplighter to tripod mini-searchlights, sometimes only a "floor standing lamp" (as they're now known) will do. They work really well to illuminate dark corners and can be squeezed behind a chair or sofa where no table lamp would fit.
Mighty Moorcroft... could be worth a bit
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Mighty Moorcroft... could be worth a bit

7. Pottery lamp

Not everyone’s cup of tea, but pottery remains very popular as a lamp base. It’s not all orange and brown blobs of clay, but 1960s and 70s designs in the distinctive colours of the era can be worth a – perhaps surprising – amount of money. It could be worthwhile having a dig around in the loft and if you find a pair of Poole pottery lamp bases or a Moorcroft flower design, for example, your luck could be in.
A banking classic
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A banking classic

6. Banker's desk lamp

If you fancy adding an air of British Banker to your office or workstation why not go the whole hog and choose a retro brass Banker’s desk lamp. If you’re a stickler for tradition, choose the brass base with a green glass or enamel shade. For those who want to buck the trend, a rather smart chrome base with a dark blue glass shade is available.
Trust Tiffany to come up with a classic
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Trust Tiffany to come up with a classic

5. Tiffany lamp

With so many designs, it’s almost impossible to choose a Tiffany lamp! These lamps are made from many pieces of different coloured glass edged in copper and soldered together. Popular designs are in the Art nouveau style and include flowers, leaves and pretty insects, such as dragon flies. There are many reproduction glass lamps made in the Tiffany style, many with the classic warm tones of reds and oranges, but also more modern and brighter colours and designs.
The Astro lava lamp is still made in Britain
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The Astro lava lamp is still made in Britain

4. Lava lamp

At one time no self-respecting student would be seen without one; now it is a staple of trendy offices and chill-out zones. The lava lamp was designed by Edward Craven Walker, founder of design company Mathmos. Called the Astro, this classic lamp was launched in 1963 and is still made in Britain today. The colour combinations include violet with red lava, yellow with blue-green lava and red with pink lava. Parts are replaceable so you can change the colour if you wish.
A greyhound. And a lamp. Why wouldn't you?
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A greyhound. And a lamp. Why wouldn't you?

3. Animal lamps

Granted, an animal-shaped lamp may bring back memories of granny’s living room, but animal figurines have featured on lamps for decades. Art deco forms popularised the elegant greyhound and stag, often cast in bronze or other metals. Pottery designs became popular from the 1950s, from owls to pussycats, and swans to donkeys, these stylised animals add a touch of shabby chic or retro cool to a bedroom or living space.
Uber-retro, it's orange and makes a statement
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Uber-retro, it's orange and makes a statement

2. "Nesso" style lamp

If it’s retro, it’s got to be orange. The coolest colour, it goes perfectly with a neutral décor offering a real focal point in a room. This “Nesso” style table lamp, originally designed by Artemide in 1962, sums up the coolness of the sixties and adds a trendy edge to a minimalist flat. This lamp produces a diffuse, glowing light from its iconic mushroom design.
Ultimate British classic, the Anglepoise lamp
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Ultimate British classic, the Anglepoise lamp

1. Anglepoise lamp

Old or new, small or large, the Anglepoise lamp is an absolute British classic. The design has changed very little over its 90-year history and is all based on the same spring balance system. The resulting lamp can of course be “poised” in any position to suit an individual’s needs. An enormous version of the Original 1227 lamp was made in 2005 for the Roald Dahl museum and generated so much interest it was put into volume production.
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