Sunglasses for Golf

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Sunglasses for Golf

They are a different animal!

Sunglasses for the modern golfer have undergone a major transformation over the past decade.  In years gone by, a cheap pair of sunglasses from the corner drug store would do, or wear none at all.  We did not realize we were damaging our eyes, and probably not playing golf as well as we were capable of playing, had we equipped ourselves with the proper shades. Golf Specific eyewear is now a prevalent part of Golf equipment for the avid Golfer, and has somewhat different performance requirements from those Fashion sunglasses or those you wear cycling, fishing, or to your favorite beach.

Nowadays, you can spend from £20.00 to £400.00 for a set of quality eyewear for golf, with a similar range of benefits.  Some things the Golf Addict should look for in a good quality golf sunglass:

1)  Do they fit me?  Will they continue to fit me on a hot day when I perspire.  If they do not fit, and are uncomfortable, then nothing else really matters.....you are not going to wear them.

2)  Is the lens functional?  By that I mean, does it enhance what I see, or does it just darken everything.  Does it block out harmful UV rays? Darker is not better on a golf course!

3)  Are they attractive?  Do I look cool in them.  Very important for the fashion conscious golfer. (Some say this should be number one.  I do not agree).

4)  Are they cost prohibitive?  If you tend to lose sunglasses, like most folks, then a pair of £400 sunglasses with 3 sets of replaceable lenses might not be for you.  If you keep the cart boys and the restaurant staff in glasses, then there are many lower cost alternatives you should try.

What Features to look for?

Lens Shapes

For Golf, you must have a lens which offers 180 degree vision.  Some call this a "swept back lens"  other call it a "wrap lens."  Whatever you call it, you must have it for golf.  Why is this important?  If you are standing over a putt, do you want to lift your head to check your alignment, or just cut your eyes to the target?  With a Wrap Lens, you are viewing the entire line of the putt THROUGH the lens without lifting your head.  Very important in golf.  Keep that head still !!

Also important to the Golfer is the Lens Trim.  A golfer does not want to look down at the ball and see the rim of the sunglass.  Thus all top quality Golf-Specific eyewear should be rimless.  Some people call this "Half Frame."  Whatever you do, never attempt to play golf in any type of eyewear which has thick rims.  This causes the player to move his head in order to see the ball, or look out underneath the lens which is even worse.  Remember, the best lens shape for you is the one which allows you to normally and naturally address and play the golf shot, with no undue movement or manipulation of your head .

Lens Performance

This is misunderstood among Golfers as well as Golf Eyewear manufacturers.  Lens Performance, simply means "protection" and "vision enhancement" and if your eyewear does not  provide these two properties, then it does not matter how much you paid for them.....you lose!  For example, for years and years golfers have assumed that a Polarized lens was a better lens for Golf.  WRONG!  Skiers have become aware in recent years that Polarized lenses tend to "flatten" surfaces.  They found this out by running up on slopes they never knew were there.  If these lenses tend to flatten what is seen, then how can a Golfer read greens and judge distances, without the ability to determine slope and terrain variations.  Golf is difficult enough without a Visual Handicap added to the game.  New technolocical breakthroughs in lenses, such as the 535S lens and the GREENREADER lens offer enhanced visual acuity without this flattening effect, and also increase the ability to read greens, judge the severity of slopes, as well as compute distances even better than the naked eye or with assitance from conventional optics

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