Trailer / Caravan Tyre load index + speed symbol tables

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In this guide we aim to give information on the speed symbols and Load index on tyres as we find a lot of customers seem to think this is part of the tyre size.

When people read the tyre size they come across the speed symbols and load index and think that it the tyre size. on some tyres it is just before or just after the tyre size.

We are in the process of changing our wheel and tyre ads to include the tyre size, how it is printed on the tyres we sell along with the load index speed symbol and tyre manufacture.

Load index

The load index is a number between 60 and 125 on most this can be written on the tyre as 1 number ie 94 followed by a letter or there can be 2 numbers written on the tyre 94/92 followed by a letter.

When there are 2 numbers the first number relates to the load that the individual tyre can carry on a single axle trailer and the second number is a weight for a multi axle trailer as the weight will never be evenly distributed they slightly lower the capacity

This number corrosponds to the load that the tyre can carry the list below shows what each number relates to in kg.

  • 60 = 250kg
  • 61 = 257kg
  • 62 = 265kg
  • 63 = 272kg
  • 64 = 280kg
  • 65 = 290kg
  • 66 = 300kg
  • 67 = 307kg
  • 68 = 315kg
  • 69 = 325kg
  • 70 = 335kg
  • 71 = 345kg
  • 72 = 355kg
  • 73 = 365kg
  • 74 = 375kg
  • 75 = 387kg
  • 76 = 400kg
  • 77 = 412kg
  • 78 = 425kg
  • 79 = 437kg
  • 80 = 450kg
  • 81 = 462kg
  • 82 = 475kg
  • 83 = 487kg
  • 84 = 500kg
  • 85 = 515kg
  • 86 = 530kg
  • 87 = 545kg
  • 88 = 560kg
  • 89 = 580kg
  • 90 = 600kg
  • 91 = 615kg
  • 92 = 630kg
  • 93 = 650kg
  • 94 = 670kg
  • 95 = 690kg
  • 96 = 710kg
  • 97 = 730kg
  • 98 = 750kg
  • 99 = 775kg
  • 100 = 800kg
  • 101 = 825kg
  • 102 = 850 kg
  • 103 = 875kg
  • 104 = 900kg
  • 105 = 925kg
  • 106 = 950kg
  • 107 = 975kg
  • 108 = 1000kg
  • 109 = 1030kg
  • 110 = 1060kg
  • 111 = 1090kg
  • 112 = 1120kg
  • 113 = 1150kg
  • 114 = 1180kg
  • 115 = 1215kg
  • 116 = 1250kg
  • 117 = 1285kg
  • 118 = 1320kg
  • 119 = 1360kg
  • 120 = 1400kg
  • 121 = 1450kg
  • 122 = 1500kg
  • 123 = 1550kg
  • 124 = 1600kg
  • 125 = 1650kg

Most unbraked single axle trailers tend to have 4 ply tyres on and tend to have Load index from 67 on 8" wheels to 84 on 13/14" wheels.

The 4ply tyres only have 1 load index number as these are generally only used on single axle trailers you can use them on Multi axle trailers but we recomend that you try to keep the load to 2 or 3 Load index numbers below the one stated.

Commercial tyres ie more than 4 ply or marked C tend to have 2 load index numbers but not all ie a 165/13 Kenda 8 ply Tyre just has a 94 load index where as most other manufactures mark their tyre this size 94/92.

Speed symbol

Speed symbols are a letter that again relates to a speed that the tyre can be used to.

The speed symbols are a letter from J to U with J being the slower speed and U being the higher speed. see the list below for speeds represented.

  • J  = 100km/h (62 mph)
  • K = 110km/h (68 mph)
  • L  = 120km/h (75 mph)
  • M = 130km/h (81 mph)
  • N = 140km/h (87 mph)
  • P  = 150km/h (93 mph)
  • Q = 160km/h (99 mph)
  • R = 170km/h (106 mph)
  • S = 180km/h (112 mph)
  • T = 190km/h (118 mph)
  • U = 200km/h (124 mph)

After this the ratings are for proformance cars.

  • H = 210km/h (130 mph)
  • V = 240km/h (149 mph)

After 240km/h (149mph) tyres are marked with ZR, and may also have a W or Y. The W restricts it to 270km/h (168 mph) and the Y restricts it to 300km/h (186 mph).

Most trailer tyres (Cross Ply, Bias Ply, 6Ply or more radials and radials marked C) are rated at M-P but 4 ply Radial tyres are normally car tyres and these have a higher speed symbol normaly S or T

For trailers and caravans made for the UK you are restricted to 100km/h (60mph ) and this means that you are alowed to increase the load on the tyres by 10% when doing this you are advised to put a little more pressure in the tyres about 3 psi.

Hope this has helped you understand tyres a little more if you require any further information please see our othe guides.

 

 

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