Tungsten Carbide Wedding Band

Like if this guide is helpful

What is Tungsten Carbide?

 

(Chemical Symbol: WC)

Tungsten carbide is an inorganic chemical compound containing equal parts of tungsten and carbon atoms.

In its most basic form, tungsten carbide is a fine gray powder, but it can be pressed and formed into shapes for use in industrial machinery, cutting tools, abrasives, other tools and instruments, and jewelry.

Tungsten carbide is approximately three times stiffer than steel, with a Young's modulus of approximately 550 GPa and is much denser than steel or titanium.

It is comparable with corundum (α-Al2O3) or sapphire in hardness and can only be polished and finished with abrasives of superior hardness such as cubic boron nitride and diamond among others, in the form of powder, wheels, and compounds.

 

Tungsten Carbide In Men's/Women's Jewelry:

 

Tungsten carbide, typically in the form of a cemented carbide (carbide particles held together by a metal), has become a popular material in the bridal jewelry industry due to its extreme hardness and high resistance to scratching.

Even with high-impact resistance, this extreme hardness also means that it can occasionally be shattered under certain circumstances.

Tungsten carbide is roughly 10 times harder than 18k gold (gold being the traditional material of wedding bands).

In addition to its design and high polish, part of its attraction to consumers is its technical nature.

Any Tungsten Carbide band is brittle. It will crack, chip or even shatter upon impact with a hard surface or object.

In the event of damage Tungsten Carbide ring cannot be repair and cannot be resized.

 

Types Of Tungsten Rings Style:

 

Most Tungsten Rings are Comfort Fit and available in the market from black ice coloring to Brushed and to high polish.

The Finish can be Domed, Flat and Beveled, Inlay, Grooved, Faceted, Bronze and Mokume gane.

Tungsten ring come from widths range of anywhere from 4mm to 10 mm

 

Have something to share, create your own guide... Write a guide
Explore more guides