Woodworking Machinery Buying Guide

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Woodworking Machinery Buying Guide

Woodworking machinery covers a broad range of tools that wood craftsmen use to cut form and shape wood. Woodworking machines make working with wood easier than using hand tools alone and can save a considerable amount of time in completing a project. Whether the machine is a saw, planer, sander, or drill, the job the machinery performs provides a quality finish, usually more precisely and in less time than conventional woodworking tools. Understanding the different types of woodworking machinery and the uses of the machine helps buyers to pick the equipment that can best perform the specifics of the jobs they work on in their shops.

One can purchase woodworking machinery at tool stores, home improvement warehouses, some hardware stores, and used equipment dealers. Motivated sellers on eBay offer a large selection of woodworking machines, both new and used, at competitive prices and the convenience of shopping on eBay makes sense for a lot of buyers.

Different Types of Woodworking Machinery

Woodworking machinery is generally classified as something different than power hand tools. Although the task performed may be similar to that of a power hand tool, the work is usually done on a platform that is incorporated as a part of the machine itself. The machine may be a free standing tool or, in some cases, a smaller version of the tool mounted on a workbench. Selecting the proper tool for the job is how true woodworking craftsmen achieve the best results for their finished projects.

Table Saws

Table saws are a standing saw cabinet or table with a flat surface over which the wood to be cut is positioned. The saw blade protrudes up from the surface of the table and the table top houses the motor that propels the saw blade. Table saws can cut large pieces of wood that are pushed across the top of the table platform and into the spinning blade. With the use of fences to guide the wood, one can perform precision to create pieces of specific widths. The user can raise and lower the table saw blades to accommodate woods of different thickness or to cut grooves. Some smaller table saws are designed to be mounted on the top of a work bench. These smaller saws have a limit to the size of material that they can cut.

Band Saws

A band saw has a platform similar to a table saw but the design of the saw prevents cutting large pieces of wood. The band saw blade is one continuous band of steel that runs through the table and is routed in a circle up a channel on the side of the saw. Cabinets positioned above and below the platform house motors, chain tensioners, and blade lubricators. Band saws are used to cut hardwoods and make fine cuts; with different style blades, one can also use a band saw to cut metal.

Radial Arm Saw

Radial arm saws are a platform saw that has the saw blade and motor suspended over the cutting surface on an arm. The blade and motor are pulled along the arm and across the wood to be cut. Radial arm saws are primarily used to make cross cuts on lengths of wood but one can also use them to make dado, rabbet, and other precision cuts.

Mitre Saws

Mitre saws are similar to radial arm saws, with the blade and motor suspended above the cutting surface; however, instead of the blade being pulled across the wood to perform the cut, the blade is pulled down to cut across and through the piece of wood. One can position the blade of a mitre saw at various angles to the wood by unlocking the blade and rotating the assembly left or right. A guide showing the angle of the cut is provided to position the blade at specific degrees. The ability to move the blade to a specific angle allows the operator to make mitre cuts for corner pieces that surround a door frame and other angled wood joints.

Planers and Jointers

Planers and jointers are different pieces of machinery that perform similar functions. A jointer is used to square up a board by performing cuts along the edge of the board to form a 90-degree angle with the top of the board. Usually used with boards that are no more than 6 inches wide, the jointer has a fence along which the board is pushed over a narrow table top. The blade of the jointer is housed at the fence in an upward position similar to a table saw, with the base of the unit housing the motor. One makes very small cuts to form the straight surface. To get a truly flat side on boards that are cupped or warped often requires multiple passes.

Planers are used to flatten the upper and lower surfaces of a piece of wood and in the process remove some of the thickness of the wood. Planers are a must when putting a smooth finish on rough-hewn wood or levelling the surface of the wood. The planer has a platform upon which the wood is laid, and the cutting blades of planers are located in the top or cover over the platform. One can set the desired thickness of the wood by raising and lowering the height of the cover. Power rollers pass the wood through the cutting blades where it shaves off small amounts (1 millimetre or less) of the surface of the wood on each pass. By using a combination of the planer and jointer, a piece of wood can be formed with straight angles on each of the four corners around the width, top, and bottom of the wood.

Drill Press

Drill presses are used to drill precision holes perfectly straight into wood of various thicknesses. With the drill motor and bit suspended over the work platform, a piece of wood is secured to the flat working surface of the platform and the drill bit is lowered into the wood by way of a spinning handle. One controls the downward movement of the bit with the handle, or locks it such that it does not exceed a specific depth. Drill presses eliminate the possibility of the drill bit veering off at an angle, which is a common occurrence with both manual or power-driven hand drills.

Mortiser

Similar to a drill press in design, a mortiser is used with a hollow chisel bit to cut square or rectangular holes in a piece of wood. The bit is lowered and pressed into the wood, similar to lowering the drill bit on a drill press.

Wood Lathes

Wood lathes consist of a wide-based platform that has two upward extensions. A piece of wood is clamped into place between the two upward extending arms and held in a horizontal position. A motor, usually housed in the base of the unit, spins a gear that is in one of the arms. The other arm has a spinning head that holds the wood in place and allows the wood to be spun on its horizontal axis. While the wood is being spun, the craftsman can use a blade, either freehand or in a fixed support, to cut away sections of the spinning wood. Lathes are used to fashion solid table legs, cutting them to round, tapered, and occasionally intricately designed supports for a table top. Lathes also fashion baseball bats from square pieces of ash wood of varying lengths, as well as a number of other round cylindrical pieces.

Sanders

A broad range of sanding machinery is used in woodworking shops. The common feature of sanders is the flat platform upon which the wood rests while it is brought into contact with the sanding surface. Belt sanders run a circular belt, usually in an upright manner, to smooth wood surfaces. There are also belt sanders on which the sanding surface is the platform: the wood is placed upon it and the belt runs horizontally, even with the surface of the wood. Spindle sanders have a round sanding cylinder that sticks up from the centre of a table and spins to allow the user to push wood up against it from various angles. Disc sanders spin a round sanding disc with a portion of the disc exposed above the work surface of the table. The disc is positioned at a 90-degree angle to the table and the wood is pressed up against it. Some sanders have platforms that tilt so the sanding surface can contact the wood at a specific angle.

Popular Brands of Woodworking Machinery

There are many different manufacturers of woodworking machinery. Buyers have a lot of options to choose from when selecting equipment. There are some brands that have gained popularity for their design, function, or dependability. The following chart lists some popular woodworking machinery brands and the products that brand features.

Brand

Woodworking Machinery

DeWalt

Radial arm saw, table saw, mitre saw, jointer, sanders

Makita

Mortiser, table saw, mitre saw, jointer

Bosch

Table saw, mitre saw, jointer

Festool

Jointer, table saw, sanders

Sealey

Band saw, jointer, drill press, wood lathe

Draper

Drill press, band saw, mitre saw, jointer, sanders

Einhell

Wood lathe, band saw, mitre saw, jointer, drill press

DeWalt is one of the more common names worldwide with regard to woodworking tools and they have a broad selection of different machinery types and models. Sealy is a popular and well-known name in the United Kingdom, as is Draper.

How to Buy Woodworking Machinery on eBay

Buyers looking for the convenience of shopping online should consider eBay when looking for woodworking machinery and tools. Sellers on eBay offer a large selection of both new and used woodworking equipment from which to choose. Shop from the convenience of your easy chair with the click of a mouse and have your purchases shipped directly to your doorstep or workshop.

Finding just the right woodworking machinery on eBay is easy when you perform searches using keywords such as 'mitre saw'. You can narrow search results by using specific keywords such as 'DeWalt mitre saw' to display only listings featuring the specific brand of equipment. Buy with confidence from eBay sellers by reviewing their feedback ratings, where previous buyers rate the seller on their satisfaction with the transaction. Buyers can be assured that online payments to eBay sellers are safe and secure when using PayPal to complete the purchase transaction and transfer funds. The convenience of shopping on eBay is perfect for today’s busy consumers.

Conclusion

Having a well-equipped woodworking shop allows craftsmen to shape and fashion plain pieces of lumber into beautiful works of art. One can create furniture, cabinets, shelving units, and custom design pieces with fine precision when using the latest in woodworking machinery. Understanding what a piece of equipment does allows buyers with limited budgets to determine the best woodworking machinery to start with as they build a tool inventory for their workshop. Having a sense of the different brand names on the market helps buyers find quality equipment from recognised manufacturers that perform well and stand up to the rigours of frequent use.

First-time woodworking equipment buyers can especially benefit from a better understanding of the different tools and their functions in shaping and modifying wood pieces to be turned into a well-done finished project. Having the right tools to do the job is a must; buying those tools from motivated sellers at competitive prices is a bonus.

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