buying WW2 USA. Military wristwatches. WARNING.

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Buying USA military wristwatches.     FAKES - REBUILT WATCHES -

A agreement with American watch houses
was that they would support the war effort by supplying
timepieces for ground troops and equipment; however,
after the war all timepieces had to be destroyed or decommissioned.
American watch executives felt that if these watches were allowed
back into the states, they would cripple business at a time when plants
had not been able to produce and sell civilian watches for years.
The United States government agreed and most of these faithful time
companions were unceremoniously crushed, buried, or dumped to
prevent them from competing with civilian watch sales.

I have seen a lot of WW2, USA  military watches. some in the WRONG CASES.
some even with civilian movements.  NEW OLD STOCK CASES ? with the WRONG MOVEMENT
some even with funny looking dials
do some looking on the web for info on the watch you are looking to buy

there is a elgin watch database were you can enter the movement number

it will then tell you the dates that movement was made.
might save you some money.
i did restore elgin watches in the past. if i can help please email.
..
look at other watches and there listings. most are right ?
there are a few REBUILT watches.
-
look out for army watches in air corp cases, 
look out for  A11. watches  ie cases with army movement in are WRONG.
most air force (corp) A11 watches.have a black dial - large sec hand - hack movement.
army watches. white face - small sec hand - ORD DEPT  engraved on case.
there are a lot of new old stock cases.
someone buys a military watch - and then puts them in new cases
NICE CASE  WRONG MOVEMENT. not worth much .
save your money do some homework
-
i have seen A LOT of funny watches on ebay
listed as pilots watches when they are ARMY movements
in AIR CORP cases. (was called Air Force later was army air corp)

 

please read again

A agreement with American watch houses
was that they would support the war effort by supplying
timepieces for ground troops and equipment; however,
after the war all timepieces had to be destroyed or decommissioned.
American watch executives felt that if these watches were allowed
back into the states, they would cripple business at a time when plants
had not been able to produce and sell civilian watches for years.
The United States government agreed and most of these faithful time
companions were unceremoniously crushed, buried, or dumped to
prevent them from competing with civilian watch sales.

.
 

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