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Details about  True VINTAGE 80s Los Angeles RAIDERS Snapback NFL FOOTBALL HAT GLASS LOT (3)

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True VINTAGE 80s Los Angeles RAIDERS Snapback NFL FOOTBALL HAT GLASS LOT (3)
True-VINTAGE-80s-Los-Angeles-RAIDERS-Snapback-NFL-FOOTBALL-HAT-GLASS-LOT-3
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These are not found often !!! True Vintage EARLY 80s Los Angeles RAIDERS 3 snapback strapback hat

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28 Jun, 2014 19:05:03 BST
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Spokane, Washington, United States

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eBay item number:
231266162686
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Item specifics

Condition: Used
Seller notes: These are not found often !!! True Vintage EARLY 80s Los Angeles RAIDERS 3 snapback strapback hat lot !!! 2 of them are tagged AJD made in USA AMERICAN WORKERS. The other is marked Sports Specialties Corp, Irvine CA made in Korea. Really Good condition for all of the hats, intact and no tears. We have not attempted to clean these hats in any way so as not to damage them in any way, we will leave cleaning up to the discretion of the new owner !!! ZOOM ALL PICTURES FOR A CONFIDENT WORRY FREE PURCHASE AND BID !!!! FEEL FREE TO BUY THIS STUNNING LOT NOW BEFORE OTHERS GET A CHANCE TO WIN IT AT AUCTION AS WELL IF YOU SO PLEASE.
 

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True VINTAGE 80s Los Angeles RAIDERS Snapback NFL FOOTBALL HAT GLASS LOT (3)




















Superb True VINTAGE 80s Los Angeles RAIDERS Snapback NFL FOOTBALL HAT GLASS LOT (3):

 

 

These are not found often !!!  True Vintage EARLY 80s Los Angeles RAIDERS 3 snapback strapback hat lot !!!  2 of them are tagged AJD made in USA AMERICAN WORKERS.  The other is marked Sports Specialties Corp, Irvine CA made in Korea.  Really Good condition for all of the hats, intact and no tears.  We have not attempted to clean these hats in any way so as not to damage them in any way, we will leave cleaning up to the discretion of the new owner !!!  ZOOM ALL PICTURES FOR A CONFIDENT WORRY FREE PURCHASE AND BID !!!!  FEEL FREE TO BUY THIS STUNNING LOT NOW BEFORE OTHERS GET A CHANCE TO WIN IT AT AUCTION AS WELL IF YOU SO PLEASE.

 

From Left to right:

 

1)  80s Los Angeles Raiders, Black marked %100 cotton, AJD fits all, made in USA by american workers, snapback/strapback, grey cord stretched across top of bill

2)  80s Los Angeles Raiders, Black and Grey Corduroy snapback/strapback hat, marked official licensed product NFL, Made in USA by American Workers, AJD

3)  80s Los Angeles Raiders Black snapback/strapback hat, marked NFL licensed product Sports Specialties Corp Irvine Ca, One size fits all made in Korea

4)  2 1970s Oakland Raiders High ball drinking glasses **** Mint *****

 

 

The Los Angeles era (1982–1994) and third world championship

Prior to the 1980 season, Al Davis attempted unsuccessfully to have improvements made to the Oakland Coliseum, specifically the addition of luxury boxes. That year, he signed a Memorandum of Agreement to move the Raiders from Oakland to Los Angeles. The move, which required three-fourths approval by league owners, was defeated 22–0 (with five owners abstaining). When Davis tried to move the team anyway, he was blocked by an injunction. In response, the Raiders not only became an active partner in an antitrust lawsuit filed by the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum (who had recently lost the Los Angeles Rams), but filed an antitrust lawsuit of their own.[9] After the first case was declared a mistrial, in May 1982 a second jury found in favor of Davis and the Los Angeles Coliseum, clearing the way for the move.[10][11][12] With the ruling, the Raiders finally relocated to Los Angeles for the 1982 season to play their home games at the Los Angeles Coliseum.

The team finished 8–1 in the strike-shortened 1982 season, first in the AFC, but lost in the second round of the playoffs to the Jets. The following season, the team finished 12–4 and won convincingly against the Steelers and Seattle Seahawks in the AFC playoffs. Against the Washington Redskins in Super Bowl XVIII, the Raiders built a 21–3 halftime lead en route to a 38–9 victory and their third NFL championship.

The team had another successful regular season in 1984, finishing 11–5, but a three-game losing streak forced them to enter the playoffs as a wild-card, where they fell to the Seahawks.

The 1985 campaign saw 12 wins and a division title, but that was followed by an embarrassing home playoff loss to the Patriots.

Raiders Hall of Famer Marcus Allen is considered one of the greatest goal line and short-yard runners in National Football League history.

The Raiders' fortunes declined after that, and from 1986–89, Los Angeles finished no better than 8–8 and posted consecutive losing seasons for the first time since 1961–62. Also 1986 saw Al Davis get into a widely publicized argument with RB Marcus Allen, whom he accused of faking injuries. The feud continued into 1987, and Davis retaliated by signing Bo Jackson in Allen's place. However, Jackson was also a left fielder for Major League Baseball's Kansas City Royals, and could not play full-time until baseball season ended in October. Even worse, another strike cost the NFL one game and prompted them to use substitute players. The Raiders fill-ins achieved a 1–2 record before the regular team returned. After a weak 5–10 finish, Tom Flores moved to the front office and was replaced by Denver Broncos offensive assistant coach Mike Shanahan. Shanahan led the team to a 7–9 season in 1988, and Allen and Jackson continued to trade places as the starting RB. Low game attendance and fan apathy were evident by this point, and in the summer of 1988, rumors of a Raiders return to Oakland intensified when a preseason game against the Houston Oilers was scheduled at Oakland Coliseum.[13]

As early as 1986, Davis sought to abandon the Coliseum in favor of a more modern stadium. The neighborhood around Exposition Park was considered dangerous at the time (which caused the NFL to schedule the Raiders' Monday Night Football appearances as away games – the NFL would not even consider allowing the Raiders to use Anaheim Stadium for Monday night games). In addition to sharing the venue with the USC Trojans, the Coliseum was aging and still lacked the luxury suites and other amenities that Davis was promised when he moved the Raiders to Los Angeles.[14] Finally, the Coliseum had 95,000 seats and the Raiders were rarely able to fill all of them even in their best years, and so most Raiders home games were blacked out in Southern California. Numerous venues in California were considered, including one near Hollywood Park in Inglewood and another in Carson. In August 1987, it was announced that the city of Irwindale paid Davis USD $10 million as a good-faith deposit for a prospective stadium site.[15] When the bid failed, Davis kept the non-refundable deposit.[16][17]

Art Shell era (1989–1994)

Negotiations between Davis and Oakland commenced in January 1989, and on March 11, 1991, Davis announced his intention to bring the Raiders back to Oakland.[18] By September 1991, however, numerous delays had prevented the completion of the deal between Davis and Oakland. On September 11, Davis announced a new deal to stay in Los Angeles, leading many fans in Oakland to burn Raiders paraphernalia in disgust.[19][20]

After starting the 1989 season with a 1–3 record, Shanahan was fired by Davis, which began a long-standing feud between the two.[21][not in citation given] He was replaced by former Raider offensive lineman Art Shell, who had been voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame earlier in the year. With the hiring, Shell became the first African American head coach in the modern NFL era, but the team still finished a middling 8–8.[22]

In 1990, Shell led Los Angeles to a 12–4 record. They beat the Bengals in the divisional round of the playoffs, but Bo Jackson had his left femur ripped from the socket after a tackle. Without him, the Raiders were crushed in the AFC Championship by the Buffalo Bills. Jackson was forced to quit football as a result, although surgery allowed him to continue playing baseball until he retired in 1994

Raiders' wide receiver Tim Brown spent 16 years with the Raiders, during which he established himself as one of the NFL's most prolific wide receivers.

The team's status faded after the loss. They made two other playoff appearances during the 1990s, and finished higher than third place only three times. In 1991, they got into the postseason as a wild-card after a 9–7 regular season, but fell to Kansas City. 1992 saw them drop to 7–9. This period was marked by the injury of Jackson in 1991, the failure of troubled quarterback Todd Marinovich, the acrimonious departure of Marcus Allen in 1993, and the retirement of Hall of Fame defensive end Howie Long after the 1993 season, when the Raiders went 10–6 and lost to Buffalo in the divisional round of the playoffs. Shell was fired after posting a 9–7 record in the 1994 season.

 

1972–1978 first world championship

The teams of the 1970s were thoroughly dominant teams, with 8 Hall of Fame inductees on the roster and a Hall of Fame coach in John Madden. The 1970s Raiders created the team's identity and persona as a team that was hard-hitting. Dominant on defense, with the crushing hits of safeties Jack Tatum and George Atkinson, the Raiders regularly held first place in the AFC West, entering the playoffs nearly every season. From 1973 through 1977, the Raiders reached the conference championship every year.

This was the era of the bitter rivalry between the Pittsburgh Steelers and Raiders. In the 1970s, the Steelers and Raiders during many of those seasons were the two best teams in the AFC and, arguably, the NFL. The Raiders regularly met the Steelers in the playoffs, and the winner of the Steelers-Raiders game went on to win the Super Bowl in 3 of those instances, from 1974–76. The rivalry garnered attention in the sports media, with controversial plays, late hits, accusations and public statements.

The rivalry began with and was fueled by a controversial last-second play in their first playoff game in 1972. That season the Raiders achieved a 10–3–1 record and an AFC West title. In the divisional round, they were beaten by the Steelers 13–7 on a play that become known as the Immaculate Reception. The Raiders won the AFC West again in 1973 with a 9–4–1 record. Lamonica was replaced as starting quarterback early in the season by Ken Stabler, who remained the starting quarterback throughout the team's dominant seasons of the 1970s. The Raiders defeated Pittsburgh 33–14 in the divisional round of the playoffs to reach the AFC Championship, but lost 27–10 to the Dolphins.

In 1974, Oakland had a 12–2 regular season, which included a 9-game winning streak. They beat the Dolphins 28–26 in the divisional round of the playoffs in a see-saw battle remembered as the "Sea of Hands" game.[7] They then lost the AFC Championship to the Steelers, who went on to win the Super Bowl. The Raiders were held to only 29 yards rushing by the Pittsburgh defense, and late mistakes turned a 10–3 lead at the start of the fourth quarter into a disappointing 24–13 loss.

In the 1975 season opener, the Raiders beat Miami and ended their 31-game home winning streak. With an 11–3 record, they defeated Cincinnati 31–28 in the divisional playoff round. Again, the Raiders faced the Steelers in the conference championship, eager for revenge; again, the Raiders came up short, as the Steelers won the AFC Championship and then went on to another Super Bowl title. According to John Madden and Al Davis, the Raiders relied on quick movement by their wide receivers on the outside sidelines – the deep threat, or 'long ball' – more so than the Steelers of that year, whose offense was far more run-oriented than it would become later in the 1970s. Forced to adapt to the frozen field of Three Rivers Stadium, with receivers slipping and unable to make quick moves to beat coverage, the Raiders lost, 16–10. The rivalry had now grown to hatred, and became the stereotype of the 'grudge match.'

John Madden (right, shown with Senator Susan Collins) was head coach of the Raiders for 10 seasons. Madden's overall winning percentage including playoff games ranks second in league history. He won a Super Bowl and never had a losing season as a head coach.

In 1976, the Raiders came from behind dramatically to beat Pittsburgh 31–28 in a revenge match in the season opener, and continued to cement its reputation for dirty play by knocking WR Lynn Swann out for two weeks with a clothesline to the helmet. Al Davis later tried to sue Steelers coach Chuck Noll for libel after the latter called safety George Atkinson a criminal for the hit. The Raiders won 13 regular season games and a close 24–21 victory over New England in the playoffs. They then knocked out the Steelers in the AFC Championship to go to Super Bowl XI. Oakland's opponent was the Vikings, a team that had lost three previous Super Bowls. The Raiders led 16–0 at halftime, having forced Minnesota into multiple turnovers. By the end, they won 32–14 for their first post-merger championship.

The following season saw the Raiders finish 11–3, but they lost the division title to Denver. They settled for a wild card, beating the Colts in the second-longest overtime game in NFL history, but then fell to the Broncos in the AFC Championship. During a 1978 preseason game, Patriots WR Darryl Stingley was injured by a hit from Raiders FS Jack Tatum and paralyzed for life. Although the 1978 Raiders achieved a winning record at 9–7, they missed the playoffs for the first time since 1971, losing critical games to Seattle, Denver and Miami towards the end of the season.

 

 

 

 




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