|

Picture Information

cm2071-Rio-De-Janeiro-Brazil-The-Sugar-Loaf-The-Gavia
Image not available
Mouse over to zoom
-
Click to enlarge
Have one to sell? Sell it yourself

Details about  cm2071 Rio De Janeiro Brazil The Sugar-Loaf The Gavia

cm2071 Rio De Janeiro Brazil The Sugar-Loaf The Gavia

Seller information

99.4% Positive Feedback
See other items

Item information

Condition:
--not specified
 
Price:
US $11.99
Approximately £8.06(including postage)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Longtime member
Postage:
US $6.00 (approx. £4.03) USPS First Class Mail Intl / First Class Package Intl Service | See details
See details about international postage here.  help icon for delivery - opens a layer
 
Item location:
New Hampton, New Hampshire, United States
 
Posts to:
Worldwide
Delivery:
Payments:
International postage and import charges paid to Pitney Bowes Inc. Learn More- opens in a new window or tab
Returns:
14 days money back, buyer pays return postage See details
Protection:
 | See details - opens in a new window or tab
eBay item number:
360967705413
Seller assumes all responsibility for this listing.

Item specifics

Year Published: 1879  

cm2071 Rio De Janeiro Brazil The Sugar-Loaf The Gavia

cm2071 Oriental Rug Review is pleased to offer an original article from Scribner’s Magazine: " Volume 18, #5, September, 1879, “Rio De Janeiro” by Herbert Huntingdon Smith. This is an original article from Scribner’s Magazine, 14 pp. (loose), 16 Illustrations, 6 1/4" x 9 1/2

About The Subject and/or the Author:

Herbert Huntingdon Smith (1851 in Manlius, New York – 1919 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama) was an American naturalist who worked on the flora and fauna of Brazil. He wrote Brazil, the Amazons and the coast (C. Scribner's Sons, 1879) and Do Rio de Janeiro a Cuyabá: Notas de um naturalista (1922). He first went to Brazil in 1870 on the Morgan expedition led by Charles Frederick Hartt. He returned to stay in Santarém from 1874 to 1876, and then spent a year exploring the Amazon and Tapajós Rivers. Back in the United States, he began working for Scribner's Magazine, writing on Brazil and frequently returning, once with the artist James Wells Champney. In 1880 he married Amelia "Daisy" Woolworth, also a naturalist. They lived in Brazil until 1886, travelling widely and visiting Paraguay but spending most time at Chapada dos Guimarães, where intensive collecting (especially of insects) resulted in the discovery of many new species. After a few months in Rio de Janeiro, they returned to the United States. The insect collections were purchased by William Jacob Holland and Frederick DuCane Godman. In 1889 Smith collected in Mexico for Godman, the results appearing in Biologia Centrali-Americanum.[1] He was then commissioned by the Royal Society to collect in the West Indies (Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and the Windward Islands, 1889–1895). He then became Curator at the Carnegie Museum. In 1898-1902 he collected in Colombia for the American Museum of Natural History, where two of his letters are kept,[2] resuming curatorship of the Carnegie Museum on his return. The couple then moved to Alabama, where they gathered freshwater and land mollusks to supply a "Shell Syndicate" consisting mainly of private collectors. Herbert Smith's abilities were eventually recognized by Eugene A. Smith, the State Geologist of Alabama, and he was hired on as Curator of the Alabama Museum of Natural History in 1910. The very many new species collected by Herbert Huntingdon and Daisy W. Smith were described by Frederick DuCane Godman and Herbert Druce (Lepidoptera); Samuel Wendell Williston (Diptera); William Harris Ashmead and Ezra Townsend Cresson (Hymenoptera); George Charles Champion (Coleoptera); Philip Reese Uhler and William Lucas Distant (Hemiptera). Smith's death was tragic. On his walk to work at the Alabama Museum of Natural History, the deaf naturalist, who had recently endured a bout of influenza, was hit by a train. The spot on the University of Alabama campus was known for many years as "Smith's Crossing." Some of Smith's papers are preserved in the collections of the Geological Survey of Alabama. Unfortunately, the current whereabouts of his field notes are unknown.

Rio de Janeiro, commonly referred to simply as Rio,[3] is the capital city of the State of Rio de Janeiro, the second largest city of Brazil, and the third largest metropolitan area and agglomeration in South America, boasting approximately 6.3 million people within the city proper,[4][5] making it the 6th largest in the Americas, and 26th in the world.[6] Part of the city has been designated as a World Heritage Site, named "Rio de Janeiro: Carioca Landscapes between the Mountain and the Sea", identified by UNESCO on 1 July 2012 in the category Cultural Landscape.[7] Founded in 1565, by the Portuguese, the city was initially the seat of the Captaincy of Rio de Janeiro, a captaincy of the Portuguese Empire. It later, in 1793, became the capital of the State of Brazil, a State of the Portuguese Empire. In 1808, when the Portuguese Royal Court transferred itself from Portugal to Brazil, Rio de Janeiro became the chosen seat of the court of Queen Maria I of Portugal, who subsequently, in 1815, under the leadership of her son, the Prince Regent, and future King João VI of Portugal, raised Brazil to the dignity of a kingdom, within the United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil, and Algarves. Rio stayed the capital of the pluricontinental Lusitanian monarchy until 1822, when the War of Brazilian Independence began. It subsequently served as the capital of the independent monarchy, the Empire of Brazil, until 1889, and then the capital of a republican Brazil until 1960. Rio de Janeiro represents the second largest GDP in the country[8] (and 30th largest in the world in 2008),[9] estimated at about R$343 billion (IBGE/2008) (nearly US$201 billion), and is headquarters to two of Brazil's major companies—Petrobras and Vale, and major oil companies and telephony in Brazil, besides the largest conglomerate of media and communications companies in Latin America, the Globo Organizations. The home of many universities and institutes, it is the second largest center of research and development in Brazil, accounting for 17% of national scientific production—according to 2005 data.[10] Rio de Janeiro is one of the most visited cities in the southern hemisphere and is known for its natural settings, carnival celebrations, samba, Bossa Nova, balneario beaches[11] such as Barra da Tijuca, Copacabana, Ipanema, and Leblon. Some of the most famous landmarks in addition to the beaches include the giant statue of Christ the Redeemer ("Cristo Redentor") atop Corcovado mountain, named one of the New Seven Wonders of the World; Sugarloaf mountain (Pão de Açúcar) with its cable car; the Sambódromo, a permanent grandstand-lined parade avenue which is used during Carnival; and Maracanã Stadium, one of the world's largest football stadiums. The 2016 Summer Olympics and the Paralympics will take place in Rio de Janeiro, which will mark the first time a South American or a Portuguese-speaking nation hosts the event. It will be the third time the Olympics will be held in a Southern Hemisphere city.[12] On 12 August 2012, at the 2012 Summer Olympics closing ceremony, Mayor Eduardo Paes received the Olympic Flag, via Jacques Rogge, from London Mayor Boris Johnson. Rio's Maracanã Stadium, which held the final of the 1950 FIFA World Cup and 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup, will host the final match of the 2014 FIFA World Cup.[13] Rio de Janeiro also hosted the World Youth Journey in 2013.[14] Europeans first encountered Guanabara Bay on January 1, 1502 (hence Rio de Janeiro, "January River"), by a Portuguese expedition under explorer Gaspar de Lemos captain of a ship in Pedro Álvares Cabral's fleet, or under Gonçalo Coelho.[15] Allegedly the Florentine explorer Amerigo Vespucci participated as observer at the invitation of King Manuel I in the same expedition. The region of Rio was inhabited by the Tupi, Puri, Botocudo and Maxakalí peoples.[16]

In 1555, one of the islands of Guanabara Bay, now called Villegagnon Island, was occupied by 500 French colonists under the French admiral Nicolas Durand de Villegaignon. Consequently, Villegagnon built Fort Coligny on the island when attempting to establish the France Antarctique colony. The city of Rio de Janeiro proper was founded by the Portuguese on March 1, 1565 and was named São Sebastião do Rio de Janeiro, in honor of St. Sebastian, the saint who was the namesake and patron of the then Portuguese Monarch D. Sebastião. Rio de Janeiro was the name of Guanabara Bay. Until early in the 18th century, the city was threatened or invaded by several, mostly French, pirates and buccaneers, such as Jean-François Duclerc and René Duguay-Trouin.[17] In the late 17th century, still during the Sugar Era, the Bandeirantes found gold and diamonds in the neighboring captaincy of Minas Gerais, thus Rio de Janeiro became a much more practical port for exporting wealth (gold, precious stones, besides the sugar) than Salvador, Bahia, which is much farther to the northeast. And so in 1763, the colonial administration in Portuguese America was moved from Salvador to Rio de Janeiro. The city remained primarily a colonial capital until 1808, when the Portuguese royal family and most of the associated Lisbon nobles, fleeing from Napoleon's invasion of Portugal, moved to Rio de Janeiro. The kingdom's capital was transferred to the city, which, thus, became the only European capital outside of Europe. As there was no physical space or urban structure to accommodate hundreds of noblemen who arrived suddenly, many inhabitants were simply evicted from their homes.[18] There was a large influx of African slaves to Rio de Janeiro: in 1819, there were 145,000 slaves in the captaincy. In 1840, the number of slaves reached 220,000 people.[19] When Prince Pedro proclaimed the independence of Brazil in 1822, he decided to keep Rio de Janeiro as the capital of his new empire. Rio continued as the capital of Brazil after 1889, when the monarchy was replaced by a republic.



Follow This Link to More 19th c. Articles From Century Magazine on eBay Like This One

Follow This Link to More 19th c. Articles From Century Magazine on the Civil War

Questions and answers about this item

No questions or answers have been posted about this item.




00085
Seller assumes all responsibility for this listing.

Postage and packaging

Item location: New Hampton, New Hampshire, United States
Postage to: Worldwide
Domestic dispatch time
Will usually dispatch within 5 working days of receiving cleared payment - opens in a new window or tab.

Returns policy

After receiving the item, cancel the purchase within
Refund will be given as
14 days
Money back
The buyer is responsible for return postage costs.
Return policy details
Returns accepted
Most purchases from business sellers are protected by the Consumer Contract Regulations 2013 which give you the right to cancel the purchase within 14 days after the day you receive the item. Find out more about your rights as a buyer - opens in a new window or tab and exceptions - opens in a new window or tab.

Payment details

Payment method Preferred/Accepted  
Credit or debit card through PayPal
PayPal preferred
 
Current bid amount
+
time left | Bid count

Current Max Bid:
Your bid amount:
Calculating import charges...
Choose a max bid >Help button.Click to expand the details about Quick bid?
Get your bid out there fast with a quick bid.
Remember, you only pay the amount needed to win, which could be less than the quick bid amount. Learn More - opens in a new window or tab
Approx.
Approx.
Approx.

or

What's a max bid?
Your max bid should be the highest amount you're willing to pay for an item.
We keep your max bid amount a secret from the seller and other bidders.
Max bidding example:
If a current bid is £20 and your max bid is £30, we bid £21 for you.
If no one else bids, you win and pay £21.
However, if someone else places a bid for £35, you will be out bid and the new highest bid on the auction will be £31. You will need to increase your max bid to more than £35 to be the highest bidder.
By submitting your bid, you'll be contractually committing to buy this item from the seller if you are the winning bidder.
By submitting your bid, you're committing to buy this item from the seller if you're the winning bidder. You've read and agree to the Global Shipping Programme terms and conditions - opens in a new window or tab. Import charges previously quoted are subject to change if you increase you maximum bid amount.
By clicking Confirm, you commit to buy this item from the seller if you are the winning bidder.
By clicking Confirm, you're committing to buy this item from the seller if you're the winning bidder and have read and agree to the Global Shipping Programme terms and conditions - opens in a new window or tab. Import charges previously quoted are subject to change if you increase your maximum bid amount.
Loading...
Bid layer is updating the contents.
Resume bidding, if the page doesn't update immediately.
d
h
m
s
day
hour
hours
Free P&P
See item description
+ See item description for postage
Approximately:
(Enter ##1## or more)
(Enter more than ##1##)
Your maximum bid:
You've been outbid. Don't let it get away - place another bid.
You've been outbid by an automatic bid placed earlier by another bidder.
You're the highest bidder on this item!
You're the first bidder on this item!
You're the highest bidder on this item, but you're close to being outbid.
This auction is almost over and you're currently the high bidder.
You're the high bidder on this item, but the reserve price hasn't been met yet.
You've been outbid by someone else.
You can still win! Try bidding again.
You've been outbid by someone else's max bid.
You can still win! Try bidding again.
Your bid wasn't accepted because it's the same as someone else's bid.
Try raising your max bid.
You're the highest bidder!
To increase your chances of winning, try raising your bid.
You're the first bidder. Good luck!
You're still the highest bidder!
You increased your max bid to
Please enter your bid again.
Enter a valid amount for your bid.
Enter a bid that is the minimum bid amount or higher.
You have to bid at least
Sorry, you can't lower your maximum bid once it's placed.
This seller requires the buyer to have a PayPal account to purchase this item. Get a PayPal account here .
Your bid is the same as or more than the Buy it now price. You can save time and money by buying it now.
Submit bid
Review and confirm your bid
Bid confirmation
Increase maximum bid
Enter a custom max bid more than ##2##
Enter a custom max bid of ##2## or more
+ ##2## approximate import charges
##2## (approximately)
Please enter a higher amount than the current bid.
+ ##2## for postage
+ FREE POSTAGE
Bid ##3## now
Bid ##3##
Time left:
Current bid:
(approximately ##1##)
Your maximum bid:
(approximately ##1##)
Increase your maximum bid:
By clicking 1 Click Bid, you are agreeing to buy this item from the seller if you're the winning bidder. Learn moreabout 1-click bid - opens in a new window or tab
day
hour
min
sec
days
hours
mins
secs
(approximately ##1##)
Winning bid:
Starting bid:
Close
Congratulations The auction has ended and you're the winner.
The auction has ended, but the reserve price was not met.
Sorry, the auction has ended and you were outbid.
Good news, you're the highest bidder.
Sorry, you've been outbid.
You're the highest bidder, but the reserve price has not been met.
Please enter a higher amount than the current bid.
Maximum bids cannot be lowered once submitted.
Please enter a valid number.