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Antique Chandeliers

Any branched light fitting that is suspended from the ceiling may be considered to be a chandelier. However, for most people, the term chandelier refers specifically to the hanging crystal light fittings as often seen in formal homes and high class hotels. Discover a wide range of antique chandeliers in varied styles, including French, Edwardian and Gothic.

The very opulence and elegance of the chandelier conjures images of a bygone era, where the highest of high society hosted grand balls in magnificent country houses. However, chandeliers could also be found elsewhere, on a smaller scale, creating a wide range of items available suitable for all kinds of homes and halls.

Antique chandelier styles vary according to their age, from classic Victorian and Gothic chandeliers with their intricate details and exquisite embellishments, to Art Deco and Art Nouveau chandeliers, which rely more on shape and style for their impact.

Classic Chandeliers

The classic chandelier comprises several layers of cut glass or crystal prisms, often in the shape of an inverted wedding cake. These are used to refract the light from the central light fittings, which usually take the form of incandescent light bulbs. Older chandeliers used candles as their source of light, making the crystals sparkle as the flames flickered and danced.

Antique Chandelier Materials

Antique chandeliers come in a range of materials, with prisms of lead crystal or cut glass and frames of brass, bronze or other coloured or plated metal. Many will also have their original workings, which often include a pulley system that allowed a grand chandelier to be lowered to the floor from a high ceiling, in order for it to be cleaned.

Naturally, with materials as fragile as crystal and glass, there is a large market for antique chandelier spares to replace cracked or broken prisms. These can be carefully chosen to match the style and period of your antique chandelier, restoring it to its former glory.

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