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Benbros Diecast Vehicle

The Benbros diecast vehicle range was created and produced by Benbros (London) Ltd. The British toy maker only existed for eight years, from 1953 to 1965 and made its toys in London.

Among other toys, the Benbros company produced diecast farm machinery models and metal cars under the product names, Qualitoys, TV Series and Mighty Midgets.

The 'TV Series' range was given its name because the toys were sold in boxes that look like 1950s televisions. The boxes for the TV Series range have the model name and picture of the Benbros diecast toy on the 'TV screen'.

TV Series was later changed, the new bright red and yellow packaging had the product name 'Mighty Midgets'.

Benbros diecast cars, trucks and vans

Benbros diecast models in the 'TV Series or Mighty Midget' collection represent a large quantity of vehicles. Benbros diecast cars, trucks and vans were common and the range also included Benbros diecast tractors , horse-drawn carriages, motorcycles and sidecars, Land Rovers, London black taxis and fuel tankers. This range of Benbros diecast models were sold in several different colours and there was a variety of different wheel types.

Benbros diecast vehicles were general not produced to high levels of detail, but made adequate toys for children of the day. Diecast Benbros vehicles are collected by diecast vehicle enthusiasts and collectors of vintage diecast cars, trucks and vans .

A particularly celebrated diecast Benbros vehicle is the Benbros Queen Elizabeth Coronation Coach and Horses. This had good detail considering its small size, it packed a stage coach and four pairs of horses into its length of 11cm.

Benbros diecast vehicles

Benbros vehicles and toys are early examples of diecast manufacturing. The diecast process uses non-ferrous metals, often zinc, but tin-alloys and copper, as well as other metals, can also be used. The metal is heated until it melts and then forced into the cavity of a mould. Once it cools it can be painted and other details, such as wheels, added.

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