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Collectable Woodworking Squares

Vintage tools for woodworking are something of a collector's item. Whilst modern power tools are all very practical there's something nice about the old, rustic designs. Collectable woodworking squares are still just as handy when it comes to DIY as they have ever been.

Whether you're a general vintage tool collector, who's interested in all varieties and manufacturers, or you're focussed solely on collectable woodworking squares, the items available range in types, sizes, quality and price to suit each requirement.

Since most of the work carpenters and joiners do involves close work surrounding joint making and component parts for building frames and panels, the most common woodworking squares are either try squares or engineer's combination squares.

All squares feature two basic elements - the beam/blade (the metal bit) and the stock/head (usually made from wood). Most stocks are fixed rigidly, but some are moveable along the beam. The beam extends from the stock at 90 degrees, providing the straight-edged angle that forms the basis of most woodwork.

Sizes of woodworking squares range from 3 to 48 inches and longer, usually determined by the type of work they will be used for, but the standard size along the beam is 12 inches.

Styles can vary wildly, with different designs of woodworking squares for specific uses, such as precision squares, combination squares and try squares.

Precision squares are manufactured to exacting standards. These solid pieces of metal feature a perfect right angle, with edge-to-edge measurement markers. Many also have the ability to be marked upon by a pencil.

Combination squares consist of a ruler blade and a moveable head affixed to its length, this allows you to measure mitre joint angles, determine flatness and as a depth gauge.

Try squares are the most basic of woodworking squares and they usually feature a wooden stock and an unmarked blade. These are primarily used to check straightness and the accuracy of a right angle without measuring.

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