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Midwinter Pottery

Midwinter Pottery was one of the UK's largest potteries in its heyday and is well known for the innovative ceramic products it created between 1910 and 1987. You'll find a wide range of items to choose from including contemporary tableware, art deco style tea services and plates shaped like old TV screens.

Midwinter Pottery is famed for its forward-thinking designs and frequently collaborated with young and upcoming designers. Alongside sought-after pieces from long-term Midwinter Pottery designer Jessie Tate, you'll find collectable items designed by homeware's biggest names such as Sir Terence Conran.

Early Years (1910-1939)

In the early years of production Midwinter Pottery produced essential items such as teapots and plates, however, it's biggest products were sanitaryware items designed for bathrooms.

Midwinter Pottery introduced tableware influenced by the art deco movement in the 1930s and the brand's quirky signature style began to take shape. Choose from decorative figurines to a wide selection of eye-catching plates, dishes and sugar bowls.

1940-1959

In the 1940s and 1950s, Midwinter Pottery's tableware came into its own with iconic and contemporary ranges such as Sylecraft and Fashion. During this time the pottery also began producing plastic tableware under the Midwinter Mode range. Choose from hundreds of ceramic and plastic items featuring floral and abstract patterns in unusual shapes.

1960-1979

Midwinter Pottery pieces from the 1960s and 1970s are among the most popular with collectors as they introduced much-loved designs from the West Coast of America to the masses in Britain. Choose from a range of classic retro designs and flower power motifs in bright colours and pastels.

1980-Now

Midwinter Pottery pieces made during the 1980s are in contrast to their iconic pieces. Polka dots, abstract patterns and bold colours were replaced by white, greys and browns. Choose from a range of cookware pieces and functional tableware from the last ranges ever produced.

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