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PENTAX K1000 Film Camera

The PENTAX K1000 is known amongst photographers and camera enthusiasts as a classic. Released in 1976 by Japanese company PENTAX, the K1000 was known as the simplest of the K series. Despite its extremely simple design and very few features, the K1000 sold well and became known as a legend. 

Exterior

The K1000 is 91.4mm (3.6in) tall, 143mm (5.6in) wide, and 48mm (1.9in) in depth. This classic camera weight 620g (21.9), and is beautifully plain and portable. Keeping it simple, the K1000 comes only in black leather with chrome trim. 

Despite its reputation for being plain and lacking features, the K1000 has its own features and appeal. The PENTAX K bayonet mount is often seen accompanying the camera and helps the user to take steady photos. There are two levers on the K1000: the film advance lever, to help the user easily move film from one spool to the other; and the self-explanatory film-wind lever. A threaded cable release comes with the camera, as well as a PC flash sync cable, to help control shutter release and flash, to perfect any photos taken. 

Interior

The K1000 SLR (single lens reflex) has an interchangeable lens, which allows older screw mount lenses to be used, but within limitations. The lens the K1000 comes with is a 50mm lens, that has up to 0.88x magnification. These features make for plenty of unique photographs. Batteries are not needed for this camera, as it is almost purely mechanically aside from the light metering info. These batteries are only drained if the lens cap is not kept attached to the lens when not in use. 

All features on the K1000 are purely manual, such as the aperture, diaphragm, shutter speed and focus, which can result in purely unique photos since these are done by hand rather than automatically. Since the K1000 has purely manual features, it is often recommended by teachers to art students to learn the classics of cameras, as well as learning to do things manually themselves. 

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