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Wargames Scenery, Props and Paint

Tabletop wargames are a diverse and ever-expanding hobby. From re-enactments of Napoleonic battles, to futuristic conflict in the Warhammer 40,000 universe, wargaming comes in enough shapes and forms to suit any armchair general. Some people buy the models to play games with friends; many others are content to collect, paint and then proudly display their armies.

Whether playing or simply collecting wargaming miniatures, there are tools and accessories available to make your models look better and your battles more realistic. From paints to scenery, everything is available to make your hobby more impressive to behold.

As all modellers know, painting miniatures, whether soldiers, vehicles or terrain, is possibly the most painstaking part of the process. Luckily, many tools are available to make the task easier. If you’re wishing to speed up the process, spray undercoats make the beginning of the task far quicker.

For highlighting, large brushes are ideal for dry brushing, whereas thin brushes are perfect for finer detail work. The paints themselves are obviously vital and each fulfil a different role, with specialist metallic paints available for vehicles and weapons and thin ink-based washes perfect for quickly adding shade and contrast. Varnishes both matte and gloss can help protect your creations from harm.

Scenery plays a huge part in model wargaming, whether playing or creating dioramas. From ruins to trees, fences to derelict vehicles, scenery can lend an air of realism. Such items as static grass or flock create realistic looking hills and fields, whilst plastic barbed wire and tank traps lend themselves well to WWI and WWII battlefields.

The main thing to bear in mind when considering scenery is the scale of the particular models that you like to collect. Certain wargames such as Warhammer work on a 28mm scale, some historical wargames can be as small as 15mm, whereas miniature railways work on such sizes as ‘0’ gauge, ‘00’ gauge and ‘N’ gauge (the smallest).

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