HOW TO PACK PARCELS SO THAT THEY ARRIVE SAFELY

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About this Guide:
There seems to be an increasing problem with parcels arriving badly packed. I have written this guide to help overcome this problem. 

I have been a retailer of Knitting Machines with a successful mail order business for the past twenty years. Recently I have been buying & selling on eBay and I have been astonished at the way some sellers are packing their items. You have only to read the feedback of some sellers to realize that they are encountering problems with the safe delivery of the goods they are selling because they have not taken the time and trouble to pack the parcel correctly.  I recently received a Knitting Machine without any packing whatsoever, just a label stuck to the outside, needless to say it arrived badly smashed and in an almost worthless condition.  So I have written this guide to make sure that when I purchase an item I can ask my seller to read this before despatching the item to me. Although I have written this specifically for my business, Knitting Machines, the principals hold good for any product. Remember it is the responsibility of the seller to adequately pack an item before dispatch. Badly packed parcels will receive no insurance compensation whatsoever leaving the seller liable to refund the sale price in full plus all the transportation costs.

 

Preparation
You will need the following:
1. A sharp hobby knife.
2. A roll of sticky tape, I recommend the 2” wide sticky brown tape.
3. Stiff cardboard, you can obtain this from your local shops or supermarket for free. A large box or two can be undone, laid flat and reformed around the machine. You must use the thicker & heaver gauge of cardboard if this is not available then you will need two layers at least of the lighter weight cardboard. Alternatively a layer of bubble wrap followed by a layer of cardboard, I never use bubble wrap on its own.

Packing the parcel
1. When packing a large heavy parcel such as a knitting machine which weighs in at around 15 to 25 KG you must take the time to secure the machine and it’s accessories first before you start the process of  the packing itself. Have a look in the instruction book it tells you how the various components should be stowed.

           


2. The carriage should be secured with it’s lock, if the lock is not available then use a roll or scrunched up newspaper but you must make sure that the carriage does not move about in transit.

              

      
3. Any empty space must have some packing placed in it before closing the lid.

             


4. Now you are ready to start the packing itself. By undoing a cardboard box and laying it out flat you can now start the process of shaping the cardboard by scoring & bending to fit snugly around the parcel being careful not to score the machine. Now you need to secure the parcel with the tape. It’s a good idea to use some extra cardboard to form two end pieces or caps to act as energy absorbers when the carrier handles the parcel roughly, which they always do.

                 


5. I always use industrial strapping to both secure the parcel as well as give the carrier something to hold the parcel by. Strong string or twine firmly tied up will do this job just as well.

            


6. Finally I always place address labels on both sides in a prominent place with a return label at one end, clearly marked with the senders address marked 'FROM'.

Who,s contract is it anyway?
One other tip, when I am buying goods I like to arrange the collection myself with my own carrier. My reasons are twofold, I can normally get a much better price than the seller is offering but much more important is the fact that if the parcel is lost or damaged I can deal directly with the carrier and organise compensation (subject to the parcel being adequately packed). I can also follow the progress of the parcel from collection to delivery because I have the tracking number from the start. If the seller arranges the transportation then I have to rely on the seller to make the claim, with all the attendant problems and ongoing protracted communications, almost certainly ending in a bad experience.

Disclaimer:
I must make it clear I have written this guide from my own experiences. I am giving you my opinion, I accept that others may not agree. I accept no responsibility for any mistakes whatsoever.

If you find this guide helpful please don’t forget to vote yes at the end of the guide.

I am happy to answer your questions.

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO VISIT MY EBAY SHOP

PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO READ MY COMPANION GUIDES:

Guide 1. HOW TO BUY A SECOND HAND MACHINE

Guide 2. THE BROTHER RANGE EXPLAINED

Guide 3. BROTHER ACCESSORIES EXPLAINED

Guide 4. A ROUGH PRICE GUIDE FOR S/H BROTHER KNITTING MACHINES

Guide 5. KNITTING MACHINES: PART 1, INSTALLING A BROTHER RIBBER.

Guide 6. KNITTING MACHINES: PART 2, ADJUSTING A BROTHER RIBBER

Happy eBaying
Kind Regards Carol Callow HKC Knitting Machines

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