What Are the Best Concert Seats in the O2 Arena?

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What Are the Best Concert Seats in the O2 Arena?

The O2 Arena has been the world's busiest music venue since 2008. The O2 Arena is an entertainment complex with state-of-the-art technology designed for the best possible acoustics. The most common question posed by fans who are buying tickets is where the best seats are located. Those buying tickets naturally want to ensure the maximum visibility and sound quality for their money. The solution depends first on the seating plan for the concert in question.

There are three seating plans used for concerts, and one can easily find out which one is to be used for a given show. Secondly, one should know about the layout of the arena, as well as the pros and cons of various locations. While the arena is designed for visibility from a wide range of viewing angles, by learning about the different seating plans and the layout of each one, fans can get the best value for their money when buying tickets to concerts at the O2 Arena.

O2 Arena Seating Plans

There are three basic configurations used for concerts in the O2 Arena. They depend on the placement of the stage and whether the people directly in front of the stage are seated or standing. Since the seating arrangement is planned well in advance, this information is public knowledge by the time tickets are put on sale. It is one of the first things to check when shopping for tickets. By knowing about the three possible seating plans, one can get a better idea of how close one might be able to get to the stage, and whether that would be desirable.

In the Round

When a concert is in the round, the stage is in the centre of the arena. This makes for the maximum visibility from all sides since the performers are on an open platform. Seats are sold for the floor level, unlike the End Stage Standing plan, in which there are no seats available on the floor level.

End Stage Seated

In this seating plan, the stage is located at one end of the arena. While acoustics are not likely to be a problem, those on the higher tier at the far end sometimes feel they are too far from the stage for good visibility. The highest tier (with block numbers in the 400s) is also extremely steep, and not appropriate for anyone with a fear of heights. Many people avoid blocks on the highest tier for this reason. Seats are also sometimes sold right behind the stage in end stage seating plans. If this is the case, the tickets should be much more affordable than other tickets. Usually, when the show is made to be viewed from all angles, it is centred in the middle of the arena.

End Stage Standing

The last seating plan that may be used for a show (although there may be other variations depending on the show) has the entire floor section standing. While a limited number of these tickets are sold, there are no seating arrangements, or numbers for the floor space. While this is often the most exciting location during a big concert, those looking for a calmer vantage point would be better off in the first tier.

O2 Arena Seating Designations

The three levels of the arena are numbered similarly regardless of the seating plan. By learning the layout of the arena, one can purchase tickets knowledgeably. The three levels common to all seating plans are the floor level, the lower tier, and the upper tier. Each level is divided into blocks and the blocks are designated by row and column.

Floor Level

When the seating is in the round, the floor level is divided into eight sections, labelled from A to H. Blocks A, C, E, and G are located at the corners of the rectangular floor space. Since the stage is only placed in the middle of the arena when the show is designed for 360 degree viewing, any of the blocks on the floor level should provide equal visibility. Be aware that other fans may stand up when on the floor level, and this means everyone behind them has to stand up, too, since seating on the floor level is not tiered.

In the end stage seated configuration, the floor is divided into eight sections, but these are rectangular blocks. Blocks A1, A2, and A3 are closest to the stage. They are followed by blocks B1, B2, and B3 in the very middle of the arena. Finally, there are two small sections labelled C1 and C3. These are the furthest from the stage and have limited visibility.

Lower Tier

The lower tier is divided into 18 blocks, numbered from 101 to 118. These blocks change slightly in shape when the stage is moved from the end to the middle. When in the round, the blocks closest to the stage are 101, 102, 103, 110, 111, and 112. The frontmost rows of the other blocks are also very close to the stage. However, due to the ovular shape of the arena, the higher rows of the other blocks are successively further away. In every block, the rows are labelled alphabetically with Row A being closest to the stage and Row Z being the furthest away.

When the stage is placed at the end of the arena, blocks 114 through 117 are behind the stage. These tickets are not generally sold since fans would only be able to see the group's equipment and the back of the set. Blocks 113 and 118 are on the sides and usually do get a good view, despite how far back they are. The blocks furthest from the stage when the show is in an end stage configuration are blocks 104 through 109. Those who want to be as close as possible should avoid these seats, although others might like them (especially blocks 106 and 107) because they are centred in front of the stage.

Upper Tier

The upper tier is divided into 22 blocks, numbered from 401 to 422. Many people avoid these blocks on principle, but they are often the most affordable. The upper tier of the O2 Arena has received criticism because the incline between rows is so steep, and there are no handrails or barriers. The 400s are definitely not for anyone with vertigo or a fear of heights, and many people have commented that it seems very dangerous. Families with children often have to have their tickets switched to a different block, since the height can be scary, even for adults. The highest rows are also extremely far from the stage, regardless of the position of the stage, and the performers can barely be seen. The rows are labelled alphabetically but stop with Row U, the highest row in the arena.

O2 Arena Concert Seating Summary

In general, the only seats that many people consciously avoid are those in the 400 block. These are often the most affordable, and they can be a good choice for adults with no fear of heights. However, the distance to the stage is so far that seeing the performers may be hard, and many people end up watching the big screen instead of the stage. The table below gives a summary of the pros and cons of different seats in the O2 Arena.

Seating

Blocks Closest to the Stage

Blocks Furthest from the Stage

Pros

Cons

Floor Level

A-H equidistant in the round; A1, A2, and A3 end stage

None in the round; 104 and 109 with end stage

Closest to the band

May be forced to stand, possible problems with visibility, price

Lower Tier

Almost all equidistant when in the round: 101 and 112 with end stage

Blocks 104, 109, 113, 118 in the round; 104 and 109 end stage

Great visibility

Slightly higher price

Upper Tier

Equidistant in the round; 401 and 422 with end stage

None when in the round; 406 to 417 with end stage

Price

Visibility, steepness of seats, lack of safety, possible sound distortion

As the table shows, there is a definite risk involved with buying floor level and upper tier seats. The safest choice is the lower tier, which may cost a little more but is guaranteed to have great visibility.

How to Buy O2 Concert Tickets on eBay

Tickets are easily found on eBay, and are often available at discounted prices. Many people who cannot attend a show after buying tickets decide to sell their tickets on eBay, making it a great place for last minute buys and discounted seats.

Buying tickets to any show in the O2 Arena is easy. Simply go to any eBay page and enter the name of the artist and the word 'tickets'. For example, by entering 'Bon Jovi tickets' you can see all upcoming Bon Jovi shows. For listings of tickets to shows at the O2 Arena, simply mention 'O2' in the title of the listing.

Most listings have a picture of the ticket being sold. The picture should show the date of the show, the block and seat numbers, and the artist, along with other information. It is important to check all this information before making a purchase. When the seller has a long history on eBay, his or her feedback score is a good indication of the quality of his or her service, and a picture may not be provided, especially if the seller has many tickets for sale. As with any transaction online, be sure to ask the seller any questions you have before making the purchase as there may not be refunds offered.

Conclusion

Buying concert tickets to a new venue is exciting and risky at the same time because the venue has so much to do with one's enjoyment of the show. Good visibility and sound quality are key to the success of any arena, and the O2 Arena in London is no exception. This huge multi-purpose entertainment complex has seating for up to 20,000 people. However, not all those seats are equal in viewing value. First-time visitors are wise to get to know the different seating plans used in the arena and the designations for different areas.

By learning how the seating may be arranged for a particular show, fans can get the best ticket in their budget, instead of buying whichever ticket appears first. In general, the lower tier has the best visibility and sound. The floor can be an exciting place to experience a concert but the visibility depends on the people in front. The upper tier is far from the stage regardless of the position of its position, and also extremely steep. The lower tier has block numbers from 101 to 118. By carefully considering all the factors involved, fans can buy tickets easily on eBay, and eagerly await a wonderful evening at the O2 Arena.

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