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Collectable Codd Patent Mineral Bottles

Invented by Hiram Codd in the 19th century for the storing and selling of mineral water, a Codd bottle is a unique type of glass bottle that has gone onto be a highly sought after collectable item. Collectable Codd patent mineral bottles, with their unique closing design, which is based on a glass marble held against a rubber seal are historic and evocative.

Stunning examples to display

Stunning Victorian designs are available in many colours and sizes and evoke times gone by. There are as many designs of Codd patent bottles as there were drinks and spirits. From sparkling glass with unique manufacturer's marks that captures the light to Emerald and sea greens. Cobalt Blues that standout in any space often sport dappled designs with patented pictorial trademarks, use them as standalone items of interest or vessels to hold flowers.

The shapes can differ from the standard, instantly recognisable bottle shape, to rounded shapes that may require a bottle stand to be stood upright. The more obscure the shape, often the rarer the piece, making it more favourable for a collector.

Collector's favourite

Made in glass or pottery to hold mineral water, elixirs, beers, scents or spirits, the Codd patent bottle is very collectable for its design, look, feel and utility, not to mention their relative rarity. Due to its unique ball and seal system, the bottle is distinguished from many other bottles and vessels from the same era. Collectors are as interested in the maker as they are the bottle itself. The bottles were made to hold a number of things from water, to other beverages and even medicines .

The collectable bottle is always of constant interest to collectors, adding a vintage or classic feel to their interiors. As decorative items, their classic letterings, makers marks and old world characteristics are at once useful and beautiful. They make wonderful ornaments, or quirky vases that can sit in any room.

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